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Apologies in advance for the length of this post. I hope it may help other Patriot owners avoid this weird issue.

I’m an independent mechanic and work on a wide variety of vehicles from Jaguars and BMWs to Land Rovers and Jeeps. Last year, I had the privilege of working on the frame-off restoration of an '83 CJ-7, performing much of the mechanical and electrical work.

Recently, a client brought me a 2014 Patriot Altitude FWD with a mysterious problem. When pulling forward out of the driveway at low speed in the morning, the rear end would suddenly lock up. By observing the vehicle while his daughter drove down the driveway, the client determined that the problem seemed to be occurring at the left rear wheel. At first, the problem would only occur in the morning after the vehicle had sat all night, but it became worse and would occur at any time of day and at any speed up to about 30 mph.

Six months earlier, another local independent shop had changed the rear brake shoes (at only 30,000 miles). The problem began to occur shortly thereafter, so the client returned to the shop to have the rear brakes inspected. The shop was unable to replicate the problem, but removed, cleaned and re-lubricated the parts.

When the malfunction continued to occur, the client took the Patriot to another independent shop, where it was once again inspected and where the problem could likewise not be replicated. The client then took the vehicle to the local Jeep dealership, where a technician reported the only issue he had found was a “burr” on the left drum, which he had resurfaced on a lathe.

So when the client came to me, I knew I was looking for something very unusual. While the local dealership has an iffy reputation, both of the other independent shops have excellent reputations, so the fact that they were unable to diagnose the problem told me I was in for a challenge.

I began by connecting my diagnostic scan tool and interrogating the ECUs for stored DTCs. I wondered if I might find a clue that the ABS system was malfunctioning for some reason and independently braking the left rear wheel. But only a few codes were stored, and none seemed to have any potential relationship to the brake system.

So I removed the left rear wheel and brake drum and carefully inspected all the components. It was obvious that the shoes were nearly new, and brake grease was still present at all the correct contact points. The parking brake mechanism appeared to work smoothly and properly and there was no indication that it could have been activating the left brake on its own.

After studying every part for awhile, something finally struck me as possibly wrong. Here’s what I saw:

91392


Note that on the forward shoe (left), the friction lining ends well below the top of the shoe’s curved pressure plate or “lining table.” Compare it to the rearward shoe (right), on which the lining comes much closer to the top of the table. This didn’t look right to me, so I removed the right wheel and drum for comparison and saw this:

91393


The right side was the mirror image of the left, with the same potential problem. So I searched online for a photo of the shoes on a similar 2014 Patriot and found this shot, which I grabbed from a YouTube DIY video (apologies for not having noted the source):

20200106_165140.jpg


Sure enough, on the Patriot in the video, the friction material comes to the same, higher point on both shoes. This looked correct to me.

I studied the brake mechanism in the malfunctioning Patriot and noted that as the cylinder piston shaft presses against the top of the left shoe's web, the lack of friction material near the top of the table could allow the shoe to “tilt,” causing the top edge of the friction material to "catch" and “dig in” to the drum. This was only a theory, but it was the best one I could come up with. It was time to try some new shoes.

This is where the story got really interesting. I was very curious to know if the new shoes would be correct, so instead of waiting for NAPA to deliver them the next day, I drove down to the store. NAPA had two differently-priced sets in stock, but both looked exactly like the ones on the problem Patriot: the friction material on two of the shoes ended too far down the friction table! So I drove down the road to O’Reilly. One set in stock, same problem! I drove farther down the road to Advance Auto. Two differently-priced sets in stock, both with the same problem!

I was beginning to think I was wrong about the friction material and that the shoes for the Patriot were just designed this way. AutoZone was my last option that evening since the dealership wouldn’t be open till the next day. AutoZone had two sets of shoes in stock. One was incorrect, just like those at the other stores. But the second set was different: the friction material on all four shoes came to the same, higher point on the friction tables! Here’s the new pair of shoes from AutoZone in the center, with the old shoes at the left and right:

91395


I installed these shoes in the Patriot, bedded them in, then tested the operation several times over the next three days. I could not replicate the malfunction. That was in January. The client reports that the malfunction has never recurred since, so I am convinced the incorrectly manufactured shoes were the cause.

Which raises the question, why were aftermarket shoes from NAPA, O’Reilly, Advance Auto and one set at AutoZone all manufactured to the same incorrect pattern? I can only assume that the aftermarket manufacturers all purchased the same incorrect CAD/CAM drawings from the same source.

I hope this information is helpful when it comes time to replace your brake shoes. This may be a case where the best option is to purchase OEM parts from your local dealership, but it would still be a good idea to check the friction linings before you leave with the parts.

Cheers,

Don
 

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Usually,the shoe with the shorter lining faces towards the front of the vehicle and the shoe with the longer lining, towards the rear which is what takes the brunt of the load under application.In your picture,it looks like they got the lingings mounted upside down on the shoes.But even the new shoes don't look right either cause both linings are the same length and both mounted high on the shoes.I've done 100's of these over the years,but don't remember ever seeing shoes like that.But,then again,I suppose there's always a first time for anything.lol
 

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OH, WOW!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you for your post. Somebody should notify suppliers.

I replaced my rear brake shoes in October 2017 at about 60,000 miles and will share my information. For some OCD reason, I decided I did not want China made shoes on my rear brakes and I pursued purchasing OEM shoes. Here are my notes:

OEM brakes have edge code AK L636 EE = Akebono, Japan. Akebono U.S. does not offer an aftermarket version . MOPAR OEM # : 05191306AA. and cost about $80 -$100 delivered.

Same rear brake system is on Nissan Cube, Sentra, Versa 2007-2012+/-. Edge Code AK A903 EE = Akebono Japan. Nissan OEM is D4060-ZW80A. Available online for about 67% of MOPAR. Currently $60 delivered.

MOPAR Brake Application Guide shows 05191306AA = D4060-ZW80A, as does Rock Auto and other sites. Semi metallic? There is also a value line.

Here's my new brakes and you can see how the pad material extends close to the ends. Nissan OEM. Camera tilted is why brake cylinder appears on top.
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Apologies in advance for the length of this post. I hope it may help other Patriot owners avoid this weird issue.

I’m an independent mechanic and work on a wide variety of vehicles from Jaguars and BMWs to Land Rovers and Jeeps. Last year, I had the privilege of working on the frame-off restoration of an '83 CJ-7, performing much of the mechanical and electrical work.

Recently, a client brought me a 2014 Patriot Altitude FWD with a mysterious problem. When pulling forward out of the driveway at low speed in the morning, the rear end would suddenly lock up. By observing the vehicle while his daughter drove down the driveway, the client determined that the problem seemed to be occurring at the left rear wheel. At first, the problem would only occur in the morning after the vehicle had sat all night, but it became worse and would occur at any time of day and at any speed up to about 30 mph.

Six months earlier, another local independent shop had changed the rear brake shoes (at only 30,000 miles). The problem began to occur shortly thereafter, so the client returned to the shop to have the rear brakes inspected. The shop was unable to replicate the problem, but removed, cleaned and re-lubricated the parts.

When the malfunction continued to occur, the client took the Patriot to another independent shop, where it was once again inspected and where the problem could likewise not be replicated. The client then took the vehicle to the local Jeep dealership, where a technician reported the only issue he had found was a “burr” on the left drum, which he had resurfaced on a lathe.

So when the client came to me, I knew I was looking for something very unusual. While the local dealership has an iffy reputation, both of the other independent shops have excellent reputations, so the fact that they were unable to diagnose the problem told me I was in for a challenge.

I began by connecting my diagnostic scan tool and interrogating the ECUs for stored DTCs. I wondered if I might find a clue that the ABS system was malfunctioning for some reason and independently braking the left rear wheel. But only a few codes were stored, and none seemed to have any potential relationship to the brake system.

So I removed the left rear wheel and brake drum and carefully inspected all the components. It was obvious that the shoes were nearly new, and brake grease was still present at all the correct contact points. The parking brake mechanism appeared to work smoothly and properly and there was no indication that it could have been activating the left brake on its own.

After studying every part for awhile, something finally struck me as possibly wrong. Here’s what I saw:

View attachment 91392

Note that on the forward shoe (left), the friction lining ends well below the top of the shoe’s curved pressure plate or “lining table.” Compare it to the rearward shoe (right), on which the lining comes much closer to the top of the table. This didn’t look right to me, so I removed the right wheel and drum for comparison and saw this:

View attachment 91393

The right side was the mirror image of the left, with the same potential problem. So I searched online for a photo of the shoes on a similar 2014 Patriot and found this shot, which I grabbed from a YouTube DIY video (apologies for not having noted the source):

View attachment 91394

Sure enough, on the Patriot in the video, the friction material comes to the same, higher point on both shoes. This looked correct to me.

I studied the brake mechanism in the malfunctioning Patriot and noted that as the cylinder piston shaft presses against the top of the left shoe's web, the lack of friction material near the top of the table could allow the shoe to “tilt,” causing the top edge of the friction material to "catch" and “dig in” to the drum. This was only a theory, but it was the best one I could come up with. It was time to try some new shoes.

This is where the story got really interesting. I was very curious to know if the new shoes would be correct, so instead of waiting for NAPA to deliver them the next day, I drove down to the store. NAPA had two differently-priced sets in stock, but both looked exactly like the ones on the problem Patriot: the friction material on two of the shoes ended too far down the friction table! So I drove down the road to O’Reilly. One set in stock, same problem! I drove farther down the road to Advance Auto. Two differently-priced sets in stock, both with the same problem!

I was beginning to think I was wrong about the friction material and that the shoes for the Patriot were just designed this way. AutoZone was my last option that evening since the dealership wouldn’t be open till the next day. AutoZone had two sets of shoes in stock. One was incorrect, just like those at the other stores. But the second set was different: the friction material on all four shoes came to the same, higher point on the friction tables! Here’s the new pair of shoes from AutoZone in the center, with the old shoes at the left and right:

View attachment 91395

I installed these shoes in the Patriot, bedded them in, then tested the operation several times over the next three days. I could not replicate the malfunction. That was in January. The client reports that the malfunction has never recurred since, so I am convinced the incorrectly manufactured shoes were the cause.

Which raises the question, why were aftermarket shoes from NAPA, O’Reilly, Advance Auto and one set at AutoZone all manufactured to the same incorrect pattern? I can only assume that the aftermarket manufacturers all purchased the same incorrect CAD/CAM drawings from the same source.

I hope this information is helpful when it comes time to replace your brake shoes. This may be a case where the best option is to purchase OEM parts from your local dealership, but it would still be a good idea to check the friction linings before you leave with the parts.

Cheers,

Don
Oh wow you are right! Looking at shoes from AC Delco and Reybestos on RockAuto seem to be wrong. I just did my wifes 2013 jeep patriot 2.0l FWD a few weeks ago and i got the Centric shoes. Her car has 127,000 where i had the shoes and drums done at 60,000 miles. Here's how the shop put one of the springs back, was backwards, lol.
91413
 

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Apologies in advance for the length of this post. I hope it may help other Patriot owners avoid this weird issue.

I’m an independent mechanic and work on a wide variety of vehicles from Jaguars and BMWs to Land Rovers and Jeeps. Last year, I had the privilege of working on the frame-off restoration of an '83 CJ-7, performing much of the mechanical and electrical work.

Recently, a client brought me a 2014 Patriot Altitude FWD with a mysterious problem. When pulling forward out of the driveway at low speed in the morning, the rear end would suddenly lock up. By observing the vehicle while his daughter drove down the driveway, the client determined that the problem seemed to be occurring at the left rear wheel. At first, the problem would only occur in the morning after the vehicle had sat all night, but it became worse and would occur at any time of day and at any speed up to about 30 mph.

Six months earlier, another local independent shop had changed the rear brake shoes (at only 30,000 miles). The problem began to occur shortly thereafter, so the client returned to the shop to have the rear brakes inspected. The shop was unable to replicate the problem, but removed, cleaned and re-lubricated the parts.

When the malfunction continued to occur, the client took the Patriot to another independent shop, where it was once again inspected and where the problem could likewise not be replicated. The client then took the vehicle to the local Jeep dealership, where a technician reported the only issue he had found was a “burr” on the left drum, which he had resurfaced on a lathe.

So when the client came to me, I knew I was looking for something very unusual. While the local dealership has an iffy reputation, both of the other independent shops have excellent reputations, so the fact that they were unable to diagnose the problem told me I was in for a challenge.

I began by connecting my diagnostic scan tool and interrogating the ECUs for stored DTCs. I wondered if I might find a clue that the ABS system was malfunctioning for some reason and independently braking the left rear wheel. But only a few codes were stored, and none seemed to have any potential relationship to the brake system.

So I removed the left rear wheel and brake drum and carefully inspected all the components. It was obvious that the shoes were nearly new, and brake grease was still present at all the correct contact points. The parking brake mechanism appeared to work smoothly and properly and there was no indication that it could have been activating the left brake on its own.

After studying every part for awhile, something finally struck me as possibly wrong. Here’s what I saw:

View attachment 91392

Note that on the forward shoe (left), the friction lining ends well below the top of the shoe’s curved pressure plate or “lining table.” Compare it to the rearward shoe (right), on which the lining comes much closer to the top of the table. This didn’t look right to me, so I removed the right wheel and drum for comparison and saw this:

View attachment 91393

The right side was the mirror image of the left, with the same potential problem. So I searched online for a photo of the shoes on a similar 2014 Patriot and found this shot, which I grabbed from a YouTube DIY video (apologies for not having noted the source):

View attachment 91394

Sure enough, on the Patriot in the video, the friction material comes to the same, higher point on both shoes. This looked correct to me.

I studied the brake mechanism in the malfunctioning Patriot and noted that as the cylinder piston shaft presses against the top of the left shoe's web, the lack of friction material near the top of the table could allow the shoe to “tilt,” causing the top edge of the friction material to "catch" and “dig in” to the drum. This was only a theory, but it was the best one I could come up with. It was time to try some new shoes.

This is where the story got really interesting. I was very curious to know if the new shoes would be correct, so instead of waiting for NAPA to deliver them the next day, I drove down to the store. NAPA had two differently-priced sets in stock, but both looked exactly like the ones on the problem Patriot: the friction material on two of the shoes ended too far down the friction table! So I drove down the road to O’Reilly. One set in stock, same problem! I drove farther down the road to Advance Auto. Two differently-priced sets in stock, both with the same problem!

I was beginning to think I was wrong about the friction material and that the shoes for the Patriot were just designed this way. AutoZone was my last option that evening since the dealership wouldn’t be open till the next day. AutoZone had two sets of shoes in stock. One was incorrect, just like those at the other stores. But the second set was different: the friction material on all four shoes came to the same, higher point on the friction tables! Here’s the new pair of shoes from AutoZone in the center, with the old shoes at the left and right:

View attachment 91395

I installed these shoes in the Patriot, bedded them in, then tested the operation several times over the next three days. I could not replicate the malfunction. That was in January. The client reports that the malfunction has never recurred since, so I am convinced the incorrectly manufactured shoes were the cause.

Which raises the question, why were aftermarket shoes from NAPA, O’Reilly, Advance Auto and one set at AutoZone all manufactured to the same incorrect pattern? I can only assume that the aftermarket manufacturers all purchased the same incorrect CAD/CAM drawings from the same source.

I hope this information is helpful when it comes time to replace your brake shoes. This may be a case where the best option is to purchase OEM parts from your local dealership, but it would still be a good idea to check the friction linings before you leave with the parts.

Cheers,

Don
Good detective work. Does that Patriot have drum rear brakes or are these parking brakes??/ My 2011 has 4 wheel discs and then a small drum for parking inside on the rears.
 
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