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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Both headlights on my 2008 Patriot are not working at all (neither high nor low beam nor even the Daylight).
I’ve checked the socket voltage in Daylight mode and it was about 13V on driver side but only 3V on passenger side.
Please could you give me some suggestions what could it be?
 

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Once again, the subject of poor/weak grounds surfaces. You need to check to make sure the ground (common...) wire on the lamp socket is zero ohms back to the negative terminal on the battery. In addition to common grounding points near the headlamps, there's a group of them that live UNDER the battery box, very subject to corrosion. My suggestion is to examine as many as you can find, making sure you add an "external star" locking washer under the wire terminal and the chassis point. The lock washer will help keep the connect electrically proper--with those "teeth" helping with conductivity, and the lock part to reduce effects of vibration.
 

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I see you've got 2 threads going on this. On your other thread I suggested the battery, but now I read here you're getting 11v. I like Jack's idea. The only problem I've had with my Patriot was a wiring problem, so the ground idea is a probably a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
UPDATE as Nov. 29th:
Thank you for your answers.
I've fixed the ground on the passenger side, voltage is now 13V, Daylight still NOT working but Low beam and High beam work.
On the driver side voltage is also 13V, but still NOTHING works: Daylight, Low beam or High beam.
Any suggestions ???
 

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UPDATE as Nov. 29th:
Thank you for your answers.
I've fixed the ground on the passenger side, voltage is now 13V, Daylight still NOT working but Low beam and High beam work.
On the driver side voltage is also 13V, but still NOTHING works: Daylight, Low beam or High beam.
Any suggestions ???
I'd suggest that you reference the bulb/socket ground/neutral/common( (whatever you call it...) to battery POS. That is the only real way to verify the ground is good. Then--and I'm sure you probably already have--replace the bulb--again! Not sure what to tell you about DRLs, it's a function of the confuser, and can be turned off, I believe, either intentionally, or accidentally. Also, remember that the DRLs do not come on until the handbrake is released. (a safety/courtesy feature for those of us that need to approach a vehicle check-point, turn off your regular headlamps, and pull the handbrake on a notch--that way the guard can see your license and security tag.

When--not if--you find the culprit, please post it for others to improve their knowledge data bank.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
UPDATE as Dec. 1st:

Thank you Jack for taking time to answer!

I've fixed the passenger side before reading your 1st post on how to test the ground wire (zero ohms back to the negative terminal).
I've seen it only last evening and I did that test today:
- on the passenger side was not zero, but the light is working
- on the driver side was like 1000 times higher (I need to use the 20k setting, the 200 was reading nothing)
I've replaced the ground wire on the driver side and now both lights are working.
And you were right about the Daylight, it was because of the handbrake.

On your 2nd post you suggest to test the ground also against the battery POS. Could you explain how to do that or refer me to some internet links? Thanks again!
 

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On your 2nd post you suggest to test the ground also against the battery POS. Could you explain how to do that or refer me to some internet links? Thanks again!
It's quite simple: Using a VOM (multi-meter, or whatever you call it...), use the VOLT scale, place red lead on battery POS, and look for 13+/- volts against a known ground--say the battery NEG, then look for the same on the common/ground wire of the bulb socket. Ohms law is a simple electrical principal, but not everyone has taken any electrical or even science courses to learn the basics.
Those of us who used to--or still do--work in the industry not only use VOMs, but much more sophisticated measuring tools, which auto-magically locate issues like these bad grounds. Good luck!
 
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