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I spawned this idea in another thread and figured I'd launch it myself.
What is it that shapes our values? Is it home? school? religion? politics? media?

I saw this video and I found it rather insightful. Any thoughts?

Do you agree? Disagree? I'm interested in what others think about this.
 

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Yeah, I fully agree--"failed parenting!" We've used technology (TV, etc.) to be babysitters for our children, we haven't encouraged them to make their own entertainment, so now we have at least two generations that MUST be entertained 24/7. Not good. There's a Liberty insurance ad where the kid has a flat and HIS insurance doesn't have roadside service, so the kid is shown with the contents of the trunk on the ground, holding a pry bar, and telling his dad on the phone, "sure, I KNOW what a lug wrench is..." while asking his buddy, "is this a lug wrench?", the buddy replies, "maybe..."

I've always thought that we missed the boat by reducing and eliminating vocational training, and push kids towards college-prep. Let's face it, not all kids are prepared to attend college and most that do so, end up with such useful and rewarding degrees, say in "under-water basket-weaving" and that skill will get you a good job, maybe even a career? I don't think so.

I was in HS in the 50's and took both college prep classes and vocational training. Our industrial arts teacher wanted our drafting skills to be good enough to get a job with a big company such as Boeing, and several of my classmates did just that, earning over $100 a week, which was good money in those days. Some of us took the college route, and in my case, washed out, and elected to get my military service out of the way. That was a game changer for me, I learned a lot about myself, became a "trained killer" in the Army, then got technical training. I later enrolled in aviation--pilot training, but before I could accomplish that, a family emergency merited my a hardship discharge to work on the family farm. But once the emergency was over--I went to persue a technical career away from the farm, and found flight training, and as they say, "the rest is geography..."

Every kid today needs a mentor--I done my fair share and my mentorees got their education, found rewarding jobs and still keep in touch. We must have more scouting, and other such programs to incite skills in youth.
 

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Millennial's are a victim of their times and surroundings, not really surprising how many of them act. It's a different world today then even 20 years ago. They were born with cell phones up their arses and the internet in their blood. Makes it tough to be anything but lazy and jaded. But as with any era of people the cream will rise to the top.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've always thought that we missed the boat by reducing and eliminating vocational training, and push kids towards college-prep.
I agree with your entire post, but this part stands out. I heard recently that the average age of a welder in NH is 57. Other trades are not far afield. If kids wants a good job they can go to technical school and learn a skilled trade, or even better, save the money, find some local welding shops in their nearest city, introduce themselves and say, "I want to learn your trade." A kid with that much ambition will have shops competing for them. They will get paid to learn! (Instead of spending it on tuition). No, its not hoity-toity like a college degree, but it will pay well and you don't have to move all over the country chasing the dangling carrot.
 

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I agree many milennials are lazy and ignorant, and it's easy to see. But being a milennial myself, and knowing a few others, I've found that other milennials give us a reputation as the hardest working generation yet. Entry-level jobs don't pay what they used to, and not everybody knows where to find the jobs, so those that have them are working 70 hours a week at times to make ends meet. This not just in trucking. Coworkers of mine at a local factory regularly volunteer for overtime, coming in a couple hours early or staying a few hours late on various days of their own choosing throughout the week. Trading quality time with their kids for a few extra dollars for rent, or food, or whatever else. Granted, a few of them have mentioned going to bars on at least some weekends, but I never saw them come into work with any alcohol still in their systems. Then there's my socially awkward self, nerd to the core. Granted I was raised in a Christian household with a good work ethic, so I may well have an advantage. But, I've put in miles of driving to try and make a life, and I'm getting ready to do something I have no experience in, escorting oversized loads around the country. Gonna take alot of work to get that off the ground, but I have no problem putting that work in.
 

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Millennial's are a victim of their times and surroundings, not really surprising how many of them act. It's a different world today then even 20 years ago. They were born with cell phones up their arses and the internet in their blood. Makes it tough to be anything but lazy and jaded.
Unless those millennials have parents with enough backbone to resist going along with the slacker parents who coddled/enabled their kids.

We didn't go along with them, and we took a lot of heat for it. Certain family members, friends, neighbors, etc. all telling us we're doing it wrong and depriving the kids by not giving them everything. Instead we insisted they earn what they wanted. And no, they didn't always like it. In fact, there were times I'm pretty sure they hated us.

Our kids went through the ups and downs, but they're all successfully out on their own.

No one's in the basement, no trouble with the law, no rehab.

The world may have changed, but the need to have an understanding of and respect for authority, responsibility, accountability, and consequence hasn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unless those millennials have parents with enough backbone to resist going along with the slacker parents who coddled/enabled their kids.

We didn't go along with them, and we took a lot of heat for it. Certain family members, friends, neighbors, etc. all telling us we're doing it wrong and depriving the kids by not giving them everything. Instead we insisted they earn what they wanted. And no, they didn't always like it. In fact, there were times I'm pretty sure they hated us.
I was 16 when my uncle offered to give me a car.
My Dad said, "No way. He'll have to earn it."
My uncle said, "You haven't seen this car!"
Turns out it was a fixer-upper that he didn't want -- it needed a ton of work and had a serious case of tinworm. Dad & I worked on it all summer. I treated it well and I got several more years and 50,000 more miles out of it. I worked to get it fixed up so I learned to value it. At the same time there was a kid next town over whose parents GAVE him a Road Runner -- which he promptly crashed within two weeks of graduation and nearly killed one of my teachers. There were coddling parents then and there are coddling parents now; its just that there are more of them now.
 

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I was 16 when my uncle offered to give me a car.
My Dad said, "No way. He'll have to earn it."
My uncle said, "You haven't seen this car!"
Turns out it was a fixer-upper that he didn't want -- it needed a ton of work and had a serious case of tinworm. Dad & I worked on it all summer. I treated it well and I got several more years and 50,000 more miles out of it. I worked to get it fixed up so I learned to value it. At the same time there was a kid next town over whose parents GAVE him a Road Runner -- which he promptly crashed within two weeks of graduation and nearly killed one of my teachers. There were coddling parents then and there are coddling parents now; its just that there are more of them now.
I think you hit the nail on the head!
What i hear so often these days are parents saving and scrimping enough money to send their kids to a ivy league type college.
Are they spoiling their kids in the process?

Whats wrong with Community Colleges or as mentioned a trade apprenticeship.

I earned my College degree by working part time during school days and full time during Summer vacations.
I also attended a well known Engineering college's extension in my area which saved me a lot of money.
I was also lucky enough to get high paying Summer jobs and worked all the over time i could get.
When i received my diploma, i valued it, was proud of my accomplishment, framed it and hung it on the wall in my room.

I realize in this day and age high paying Summer jobs for college kids are scarce and non-existent in some areas.
But in part i blame that on our country's past trade policies which eliminated a lot of manufacturing jobs in the past few decades.
 

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You are right about that. Most parents can't or won't do any of that. It is a very hard thing to do in the world today. I do believe that most of these kids will turn out ok though. Every era has had it issues and they came out of it ok. Think about the kids of the 60's they were considered "long haired hippies" and worse and somehow they pulled through. Have to hope these kids will too.
 

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Lol why the heck you even mentioning the name Palin!
 

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....I've always thought that we missed the boat by reducing and eliminating vocational training, and push kids towards college-prep. Let's face it, not all kids are prepared to attend college and most that do so, end up with such useful and rewarding degrees, say in "under-water basket-weaving" and that skill will get you a good job, maybe even a career? I don't think so....

I was in HS in the 50's and took both college prep classes and vocational training. Our industrial arts teacher wanted our drafting skills to be good enough to get a job with a big company such as Boeing, and several of my classmates did just that, earning over $100 a week, which was good money in those days....

.....Every kid today needs a mentor--I done my fair share and my mentorees got their education, found rewarding jobs and still keep in touch. We must have more scouting, and other such programs to incite skills in youth.
A lot of your HS history kind of parallels mine.
Back in HS i went the vocational curriculum route.
Machine shop, auto shop, drafting, wood shop and electric shop.
Electric shop and accompanying electronics caught my interest.

Looking back i had no intention nor would i ever think i'd end up with an EE degree in the future.
Getting that degree was no easy task either with no college prep courses.

If i would of washed out of college, i would of been more than happy entering say an Electrician apprenticeship program which i did briefly during one of my Summer jobs at a local steel mill when it was looking like i would wash out of college.

But i persevered especially in the math area with help of a fellow college student which was sort of a mentor who became a friend back then.
Dog'd him with questions every chance i got.
I wish i could thank that guy today.
 

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.......help of a fellow college student which was sort of a mentor who became a friend back then.
Dog'd him with questions every chance i got.
I wish i could thank that guy today.
No doubt you remember his name, so maybe look him up on spacebook? (yes I know it's technically "facebook", but I'm a nerd, so....)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
But i persevered especially in the math area with help of a fellow college student which was sort of a mentor who became a friend back then.
Dog'd him with questions every chance i got.
I wish i could thank that guy today.
Rosso has a good idea. Can you find your friend? The internet has it problems, but maybe you can find him. Give it a try.

A few years ago I was chatting with a college friend. We both attended the same church during college and we commented about how good the minister was. I did a little research, found out the minister was in his 90s and still living. I took it upon myself to write to him and he wrote me back thanking me.

He died only a few weeks later. I'm so glad I wrote that letter!

There's a couple more I should write . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Whats wrong with Community Colleges or as mentioned a trade apprenticeship.
Nothing wrong with community colleges. All a student has to do is deliberately pursue the subject and learn the material. Be the best student the community college has. You'll get a better education than an ivy league student who partied his way through college on his parents' money.

A high-prestige school may look good on a resume and may even get you an interview, but after that its up to you. Performance trumps education every time. Twenty years down the road no one will care what school you went to.
 

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I went to a local technical college and here at work I have a higher position and make more than many many people that have bachelors/master degrees and whom have went to some of the most accredited colleges in the area/county.
 

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I went to a local technical college and here at work I have a higher position and make more than many many people that have bachelors/master degrees and whom have went to some of the most accredited colleges in the area/county.
Exactly! If I were a student today I'd be going into a trade. Even if stuff is made in China, it has to get fixed where its sold.
 

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I'm not in a trade, I'm in IT!
If I went there for a trade I'd be making way more than I am now!
 
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