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The absolute weight limit in towing for the patriot is 2000lbs. That is assuming you have the oil cooler add-on that is available through mopar or some other aftermarket companies. That is Trailer + Boat must be less than 2000 lbs. It may be possible to haul more but the tranny and engine may overheat, even with the oil cooler installed. If you do choose to haul 2400lbs, understand first that all bets are off. Secondly, I'd have my transmission serviced right before you do the towing, and have the oil cooler installed. Then run a very high 5W-30 (Yes 30) synthetic like Mobil 1, Royal purple, or AMS-OIL. Drive very slowly and leave long brake distances. Oh and have nothing else in loaded inside the Pat besides yourself as the car will overloaded as it is. And if possible have no gas or other items in the boat.

All that being said, it probably is possible to do. My friend once had about 50 cases of beer plus 4 - 200+lb guys in his 2000 chevy venture, roughly about 2200 lbs inside the car, and it drove, sluggishly, but drove. So 2400lbs towing weight isn't that outlandish, but Chrysler can't guarantee anything after 2000lbs.
 

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The absolute weight limit in towing for the patriot is 2000lbs. That is assuming you have the oil cooler add-on that is available through mopar or some other aftermarket companies.
The oil cooler helps, but not in the context that Chrysler uses. The oil cooler does absolutely nothing to increase the towing capability of the vehicle. Does it keep the engine a little cooler? Yes, but that is not a directly translated to towing capability.

General rule of thumb for the riots(2.4L) for an experienced driver and recreational/occasional towing(With or without Chrysler's magical oil cooler):

CVT 4x2: 2000lbs
CVT 4x4: 2000-2500lbs
5sp 4x4: Do not exceed vehicle weight and don't be an idiot.

So badjoey:

Is that just what the boat weighs or is that boat and trailer?

You could tow that(Assuming total weight), but you're definitely going to have traction issues on some wet ramps. And it's going to wear out the transmission if this is a frequent task.
 

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The owners manual notes that towing over 2,000 lbs, trailer brakes are required.... For what its worth
In the US...

Other countries having different towing limits in their owners manual, for the exact same petrol patriot.

The "rate" is more legalities and liability(Subjective to each country) than it is vehicle capability.
 

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The owners manual notes that towing over 2,000 lbs, trailer brakes are required.... For what its worth
Page and what model year please??? 2000lbs is max towing capacity period.
 

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You are correct. My apologies.

That must be some kind of screw up due to different towing capacities for different countries. The right hand didn't know what the left was doing. In the US 2000lbs is the maximum the vehicle is rated for so to have a section of the manual saying to use brakes if over 2000lbs is stupid.

Regardless of what the OM says in that section/paragraph I would not tow over 2000lbs in the US with a Patriot. Not even with trailer brakes. The legal liability if you had an accident and were found at fault would be enormous.
 

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Regardless of what the OM says in that section/paragraph I would not tow over 2000lbs in the US with a Patriot. Not even with trailer brakes. The legal liability if you had an accident and were found at fault would be enormous.
Not really, I can't refute in absolutes(and neither can you) since legality and liability are subjective to the operating state, licensed state, and insured state.

In ANY case, gross negligence would have to be proved to induce liability where there wouldn't be otherwise. Furthermore even if you were deemed liable in this scenario your insurance company would have to cover you, not to exceed liabilities you purchased from them.

For any serious criminal charges malicious intent would have to be proved, which won't happen.

Warranty issues would fall where there always do, the manufacturer has to prove your actions directly caused the failure, exceeding there OM limits does not exempt them from burden of proof.

That must be some kind of screw up due to different towing capacities for different countries. The right hand didn't know what the left was doing. In the US 2000lbs is the maximum the vehicle is rated for so to have a section of the manual saying to use brakes if over 2000lbs is stupid.
It's not.

It is very common for manufacturers to have different towing capacities for different countries. Every country has different laws and companies can get away with higher capacity ratings in other countries. Although sometimes it is as simple as marketing. If the pat could tow 3500Lbs, they may voluntarily lower the limit in the OM as to not directly compete with their own models. However in another country where there line up is not as variant, they may increase the rating because they wouldn't be competing with any other members of their product line up in that country.

Bottom line, that number in your OM is just a number. You need to use your own best judgement based on your own towing scenario.
 

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You are correct. My apologies.

That must be some kind of screw up due to different towing capacities for different countries. The right hand didn't know what the left was doing. In the US 2000lbs is the maximum the vehicle is rated for so to have a section of the manual saying to use brakes if over 2000lbs is stupid.

Regardless of what the OM says in that section/paragraph I would not tow over 2000lbs in the US with a Patriot. Not even with trailer brakes. The legal liability if you had an accident and were found at fault would be enormous.
Hey no worries. I'm not even suggesting anyone tow more than 2,000 lbs. I just found it interesting that was in the manual. I think you are right that they must have just left it in there for liability, even though they changed the rating to say 2,000 lbs US.

I see Lordy's point in just being a number and using best judgment. I am sure pulling 2,000-2,500 lbs would be doable with the Patriot, but pulling a trailer that weighed around 1,500 lbs while trying to get up to freeway speed going up an inclined onramp... I knew that trailer was behind me. I would hate to try and do the same thing with another 1,000 lbs added. On some rural road going no more than 55, I may be more inclined to fudge the limit. But not on the interstate going near 70...
 

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Not really, I can't refute in absolutes(and neither can you) since legality and liability are subjective to the operating state, licensed state, and insured state.

In ANY case, gross negligence would have to be proved to induce liability where there wouldn't be otherwise. Furthermore even if you were deemed liable in this scenario your insurance company would have to cover you, not to exceed liabilities you purchased from them.

For any serious criminal charges malicious intent would have to be proved, which won't happen.

Warranty issues would fall where there always do, the manufacturer has to prove your actions directly caused the failure, exceeding there OM limits does not exempt them from burden of proof.



It's not.

It is very common for manufacturers to have different towing capacities for different countries. Every country has different laws and companies can get away with higher capacity ratings in other countries. Although sometimes it is as simple as marketing. If the pat could tow 3500Lbs, they may voluntarily lower the limit in the OM as to not directly compete with their own models. However in another country where there line up is not as variant, they may increase the rating because they wouldn't be competing with any other members of their product line up in that country.

Bottom line, that number in your OM is just a number. You need to use your own best judgement based on your own towing scenario.
I am not going to get into a big pee'ing contest with you. I will just say if you think exceeding the mfg's listed tow capacity does not put you in a bad legal situation if you get in an at fault accident you are going to be very sad and surprised at what happens if it ever happens to you. It doesn't matter if the Patriot is rated at 10,000lbs in Western New Guinea what matters is how it is rated in the country you live in and drive it in. if it is only rated at 2000lbs here that is the max you should tow or risk legal issues if in an at fault accident. Seen it happen.

You don't have to have done anything "maliciously" to be sued either. Not in this country. The fact the towing capacity is listed in the owner's manual and/or easily obtainable from the mfg is all the person suing you needs to make their case IF you have an at fault accident with them while towing. Whether or not you knew about the max capacity or not does not come in to play. You should have known is all that matters.

At the very least you will see your policy skyrocket, perhaps be told your policy no longer covers you while towing, and you could even have the policy cancelled when the company finds out you towed over the vehicles rating and you got into an accident that cost them a butt load of cash. You can also be sued beyond what your insurance pays to the person injured. IF you exceed the towing capacity and are at fault, and they find out about that, you will be sued beyond your policy coverage almost for sure. All I will say further.

In regards to the owner's manual comments. I understand the same vehicle has different capacities, oil spec's, and even options in different countries many times. Never said otherwise. I acknowledged that fact in my comments. However, the owner's manuals are not usually just used across the board. Sections of the manual that are the same for all will be used but generally there will be some differences. When there are big differences like the towing capacities you usually see the differences in the manuals in the different countries.

A perfect example of this is the diesel engine used in other countries in the Patriot. No mention of it in my manual because in the US the Patriot does not come with a diesel hence the owner's manual does not cover it. The same should apply to that notation about trailer brakes. No need for it to be in the US owner's manual as the Patriot is not supposed to tow over 2000lbs here.

So my point was while the Patriot may have a higher tow capacity elsewhere, which makes the "use trailer brakes if towing over 2000lbs notation applicable", it is stupid to have it in the US manual when 2000lbs is the max that you are supposed to tow with one here. All that does is add confusion to the mix. I would bet that was a slip up by the editing department. There is no reason for the US Patriot owner's manual to contain that notation when the max towing capacity for the vehicle in the US is 2000lbs. Certainly if in a different country with a higher max capacity it would apply and should be included.

IMO anyone who knowingly and routinely exceeds the mfg's max listed towing capacity, even if the vehicle is capable of more, is doing a foolish thing. At the very least you set yourself up as the at fault party in an accident if you were towing at the time. Think that wont come into it? Think again. It won't matter if the tow capacity is higher elsewhere. What matters is what it is rated at here in the US( if that is where you are ).
 

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I won't get into a pee'ing match with you either, but you have a flawed understanding of the legalities involved. Again you speak in nationwide absolutes when I've already stated almost every aspect of insurance law and civil liability is dependent on the state you are insured and the state operation.

That being said your advice is generally sound, if someone has to ask, usually it is best for them to not exceed the limit. But what if that only had an extra 500Lbs and only needed to go 25 miles?

I see where you are coming from, and your advice is good, your legal rationality behind the advice could use some help, but there's a lot of misinformation regarding the topic so no worries.

I don't advocate irresponsibility, when someone asks about towing I try to bring to light all the variables and let the driver decide for himself based on their own experience and comfort level.

I am not going to get into a big pee'ing contest with you. I will just say if you think exceeding the mfg's listed tow capacity does not put you in a bad legal situation if you get in an at fault accident you are going to be very sad and surprised at what happens if it ever happens to you.
Please explain to me how, legally, you become MORE liable in an at fault accident specifically because you exceeded towing limits? You don't. Now if you were being irresponsible and your additional payload caused the accident it can make you at fault, but it does not increase your liability, nor does it increase the amount someone could sue you for. It is simply the same laws involved as any other at fault accident.

You don't have to have done anything "maliciously" to be sued either. Not in this country. The fact the towing capacity is listed in the owner's manual and/or easily obtainable from the mfg is all the person suing you needs to make their case IF you have an at fault accident with them while towing. Whether or not you knew about the max capacity or not does not come in to play. You should have known is all that matters.
A. They can't sue you for anymore or less than because you were towing past spec, in a civil suit you are liable for damages caused, towing is irrelevant.

B. Unless the law enforcement agency that responded to the accident weighs your vehicle and trailer and records the weight in the police report it would be impossible for the plaintiff or his counsel to make this information admissible in a court of law.

At the very least you will see your policy skyrocket, perhaps be told your policy no longer covers you while towing, and you could even have the policy cancelled when the company finds out you towed over the vehicles rating and you got into an accident that cost them a butt load of cash. You can also be sued beyond what your insurance pays to the person injured. IF you exceed the towing capacity and are at fault, and they find out about that, you will be sued beyond your policy coverage almost for sure. All I will say further.
I'll admit I'm not familiar with the insurance law in every state, but I'm certain it cannot be legal for an insurance company to not cover an individual while they are towing. True they can either drop you or raise your rates, that is the case for any at fault accident, and is based off the total dollar amount of liability, not driver actions.

And once again you will not and cannot be sued for anymore or less because of your towing weight, civil suits are awarded based on damages.

IMO anyone who knowingly and routinely exceeds the mfg's max listed towing capacity, even if the vehicle is capable of more, is doing a foolish thing. At the very least you set yourself up as the at fault party in an accident if you were towing at the time. Think that wont come into it? Think again. It won't matter if the tow capacity is higher elsewhere. What matters is what it is rated at here in the US( if that is where you are ).
Without exceptions? So you believe that the oil cooler adds 500lbs to the towing capacity of the patriot? Of course not!
 
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