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I don't know how many out there develop software but how good is it to learn the language Ruby? It seems to be an upcoming language. What about Python? Would these be very useful to learn for the future job growth?
 

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I don't know how many out there develop software but how good is it to learn the language Ruby? It seems to be an upcoming language. What about Python? Would these be very useful to learn for the future job growth?

To be honest I've never wrote in those, I've always been more c++ or c# but most of my programming is personal projects or what not, I do a lot of web as well, all langs that are bigger like those have a use for someone, maybe someone else here has used those 2 specificly

At one time I was doing game maker 7 and made a game scandux 2, it was cool not super professional but a fun game had a nice community of about 500 or so active players, lasted a good year til we released a buggy update and erased accounts accidentally.
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I wonder how many people on this forum are developers.

I am still trying to decide how to move forward in a career in software development. Is it best to concentrate on a couple languages or be more of a jack of all trades and use and learn a lot of different languages?
 

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It really depends on what you are going to be doing.

Ruby and python are mostly web programming languages, both really good to know. BUT if you do not want to go into website design/functionality. then I wouldn't learn them.

What specifically are you looking to do? I'm a systems admin and know basically no ruby or python... I do know powershell though, and in the future windows is pushing for windows sever to remove all GUI, and be command line only. so I am trying to learn it as quickly as possible.

In my experience, being a jack of all trades (languages/skill sets) makes it easy to get a job, but you won't get paid tons... if you specialize in one thing, you can get paid a lot of money, as long as that skill is still needed. If I were to do that I would specialize in something that will never go away, like unix/linux/powershell, but also have a lot of knowledge of other things as well, so you stay versatile.
 

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Right now I specialize mostly in java,c# and database. I know almost nothing about web front end. Maybe this is a good chance to get up to speed a little bit on that stuff.
 

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Developer checking in

As a developer in a few primary languages, mostly older ones, (COBOL, JCL, assembler, SQL) I have to say that in my experience dabbling in other languages, python is a very powerful language to know. It has a lot of general purposes, and can be useful in creation a lot of tools. I had a brief encounter with ruby, seemed like a cool language, and I know it is gaining a lot of popularity lately, but if you are looking for job growth, I see the most jobs out there in java and HTML. Specializing there will do you great favors in the future in my opinion.
 

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As a developer in a few primary languages, mostly older ones, (COBOL, JCL, assembler, SQL) I have to say that in my experience dabbling in other languages, python is a very powerful language to know. It has a lot of general purposes, and can be useful in creation a lot of tools. I had a brief encounter with ruby, seemed like a cool language, and I know it is gaining a lot of popularity lately, but if you are looking for job growth, I see the most jobs out there in java and HTML. Specializing there will do you great favors in the future in my opinion.
YES! Very similar to my experience. If you want to be in the "commercial" arena, then java and html are the basics. Then, of course, C++, etc. However there is a growing demand for gaming programmers--and they use the more modern languages/compilers. With more and more games showing up for smart phones, and the continuous sales of high end desktops for serious gaming, that may be the direction you'd want to go.

Not wanting to "date" myself more than you can surmise from my signature, back in "the good old days" at IBM, we mainframe/processor types were fluent in all MACHINE language for the various processors--way ahead of the OS.
 

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Not a programmer, for sure, but have used a lot of them, and we have many here at work.

If you want I can ask around?

I'll throw this out there though. how will the layoff my Microsoft of 18,000 people, basically shutting down XBox ops, even with most of the cuts being admin jobs, some have to be programmers?
 

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Programmers here mostly work on our on-line learning suite of courses. Some work in our testing area, a lot o tests today are on-line.

I worked with a guy to build my work flow system, connecting Xerox, Sharepoint. and Oracle together. He's moved on and is a big shot at UPMC now.


If anyone is ever interested in jobs in Pittsburgh, let me know.
 

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Heh lots of our vendors are working on bailing ship from Java to other platforms due to compatibility/stability issues with their plugins. Python is a good one to know even if just basic knowledge. And truth to linux/unix - glad I learned it years ago in school, it comes up once in a while. Doing an educational R&D project right now (in scientific linux) with the son of the developer of C++ :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Guess I will be learning/working with python and ruby for the next year at least. Hope I like it. I do like to learn but I hope I continue to like it after I know the languages better.
 

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I've worked with C, Java, C++, python, HTML(5), bit of assembly, ladder logic, and probably a few others. C, Java, C++, Web languages and ladder logic(if you're interested in controls engineering) are the one's I've seen on big projects.
Java: Android (very useful and can be lucrative or just fun)
C++: Windows programs
Web: of course everything (Chrome apps I believe are at least partly HTML5) and PHP if you're interested in web stuff!
Ladder logic: Amazon, walmart, Lowes, Home depot, basically all retail stores use PLC's to control their warehouses and they use ladder logic. There are some microcontroller based warehouse systems (I think written in C) but a majority are ladder logic.
 

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I want to make an mobile app on Java. Think that it will be a god idea to make a little help with the logistics? It`s my project for college homework, so i will ask a help from professionals to help me do my assignment.They always provide me with excellence in every homework task. So any ideas about the program? What do you actually need in program?
 

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I've never written a mobile app in Java. I use xamarin which is mostly c# and it is cross compatible between android and ios. I guess since android uses java in its apps natively it shouldn't be really any different than writing anything else in java except there are certain android apis to use. I would not recommend using java in ios.
 

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As it has been for the past 50 years+, a lot of software is designed around a particular hardware configuration. So, depending upon the hardware, learn/utilize the software the hardware is seeking. Good luck!
 

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Hello! There are a lot of programming languages that are in trend nowadays. Anyway, I believe the most high-demand languages are Java, Python, Java Script. Any custom software development company always expand the departments with these programmers and targets all the marketing goals on these departments.
 
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