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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at a 2014 Patriot High Altitude 2.0 with 47K miles for 9937.00.
I love it, but I'm concerned about a CTV transmission.
What do I need to know?
 

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As long as the CVT is properly maintained, it's just as reliable as any other transmission. With only 47k miles, it prpbably hasn't had any service done yet. If you get it, just make sure to get the fluid and filters replaced by 60k miles, and at least every 60k miles thereafter.
 

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In addition to the maintenance, you should know that CVT's can be rebuilt/repaired despite what you may read or hear elsewhere.

And for fluid, I would recommend using something other than Mopar fluid, like Amsoil, Valvoline, or Castrol Transmax.

I am a firm believer in changing the factory fill and filters at 30k to get rid of all the small bits of metal that occur during the break in period so they aren't floating around and scoring the valve bores and restricting fluid flow by clogging the filter. Change intervals after that would be every 30k-60k depending on driving conditions. Heat, towing, hills, will degrade the fluids anti-foaming capabilities, and when the fluid foams the pump can't pump it, and eventually a whine / limp mode shutdown occurs.

The manual shows 120k miles for normal driving and 60k for extreme, but transmissions have had problems with overheating due to degraded fluid long before that.

Do a search and you'll find all kinds of posts on it.

Fluid and filter changes really aren't difficult, they just take a little time and cost a little money, but much less than having a transmission replaced.
 

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The manual shows 120k miles for normal driving and 60k for extreme, but transmissions have had problems with overheating due to degraded fluid long before that.
I agree, and I'm just chiming in that FCA's definition of severe service covers most of us so I suggest that unless you only drive to church on Sunday in the spring and fall, your Patriot probably fits the definition of severe service. If your temperature drops below 32F or gets above 85F, the fluid is wearing out much faster than you probably expect. If you are in a hot climate or tow anything you might consider getting a tranny cooler. They're not real expensive and if you plan on keeping your Patriot for awhile its worth the investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm in South East TX.
I have a 25 mile commute every day.
I plan to get the fluid and filter changed shortly after I buy it if I do.
Not pulling nothing but a walmart bag that gets stuck under it if it so happens.
I'm 46 and I no longer drive aggressively.
I've just seen a lot of horror stories and I'm skeptical.
47,000 on a 14 is low and it's a one owner vehicle.
 

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I'm in South East TX.
I have a 25 mile commute every day.
I plan to get the fluid and filter changed shortly after I buy it if I do.
Not pulling nothing but a walmart bag that gets stuck under it if it so happens.
I'm 46 and I no longer drive aggressively.
I've just seen a lot of horror stories and I'm skeptical.
47,000 on a 14 is low and it's a one owner vehicle.
At 47,000 I'd say you're buying it at a good time. Since you're presumably in a hot climate changing out the CVT fluid should definitely be on your to-do list, but its not must-do ASAP -- just don't forget about it.

As for the horror stories, those are the stories you hear. Jeep was cranking out 10,000 of these per month. The ones that had trouble come to websites like this for help or just to vent. I'd bet dollars to donuts (approaching parity these days) that most of the problems were people who didn't change their fluid until 100,000+ miles, if ever.

As I've said elsewhere on this forum, I've had several of the conventional trannies in my 20+ vehicles fail in the 50-60,000 mile range. Both my CVTs got double those miles without trouble, one went triple!
 

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My Patriot is the only vehicle I've ever driven that has a CVT. When I first got it, I didn't like it because it didn't sound right. There's no shifting, so when you're accelerating it seems that the engine just droves on and on, and it seemed to really lack in power. Then I read some articles, watched some videos, and experimented behind the wheel a little. I learned how the CVT behaves and I've grown to really like it. Basically, if you need to accelerate quick, you just need to give it a little more gas than you would a regular automatic trans. Another thing to become accustomed to is the fact that it'll shake a bit when stopped and in gear, like at traffic lights. It's perfectly normal for CVT Patriots. Apparently, the torque converter is programmed a little aggressively. I put mine in neutral at lights.But most importantly, DO NOT follow the factory recommended service intervals! Change the fluid and filters at least every 60k miles, and use a good aftermarket CVT trans fluid. I use Castrol TransMaxx.
 

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Zepfan, buying used is often buying problems someone else didn't want to fix, and if the trans was acting up at all (whining, over-heat, limp mode) the previous owner may have traded it thinking a failure was imminent (after reading/hearing horror stories), even though a fluid and filter change may have been all that was needed, as we've seen happen here so many times before, at even lower mileage.

IMO, the condition of the fluid and filters is an un-known at this point and can only be assumed. I would ask to have both changed as a condition of the sale, along with proof that there are no metal bits in the bottom of the pan. The old filters should be provided for verification the service was done.

An appropriate warranty should be considered so you have enough time to test it.
 

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I've posted this before, but here are three sources that talk about the problems with low mileage metal filing build up and the harm it can cause:

CVT Success: In-Vehicle Isolation of Common Problems

"The first false assumption has to do with the magnets. A certain amount of magnetic fuzz is normal in a CVT inspected with 40 to 50 thousand miles. The push-belt links create fretting where they contact the sheave/pulley surface, most of which is generated during break-in. But in noting this material is normal, consider that much of that ferrous fuzz has been circulating throughout the valve body. It has embedded into the solenoids and stuck onto the speed sensors — all of which are electromagnets — while also scrubbing away at the aluminum valve bores. This means that the fuzz is indeed normal, but so is low-mileage valve bore wear."

JF011E, RE0F06A, RE0F10A

"The most expensive repair of CVT happens when the pressure in the system drops. The reason for this is the chips and coating of the pressure relief valve in the CVT pump.The oil pump RE0F10A / JF011E is the most vulnerable part of the CVT. The cover of the pressure relief valve is torn off, the valve is jammed is in a hot state. Further, because of low pressure, the belt RE0F10A / JF011E is erased. The shavings from the belt and the pulleys get into the valve body, and the car with the buzzing sound stops with the pressure errors in the pulleys. In this case, the oil pump, CVT belt and valve body are replaced. If the pulleys are erased, the set of pulleys is also replaced."

"Oil is replaced in the RE0F10A / JF011E CVT every 60 000 km (approx. 37k mi) together with the internal and external filters (located under the heat exchanger). After removing the cooler, it is necessary to replace the rubber ring."

Jatco JF015E: a CVT That Is Crazy About Cleanliness - The AKPPro Magazine

"Harmful Filings
A common complaint of the car owner is irregular motion, kicks at acceleration. There may be several reasons behind this kind behavior of a car. However, virtually all of them have to do with oil contamination with the pulley debris – metal chips or filings can create a variety of problems. There are magnets in the crankcase to mitigate harmful effects of these metal particles, they have to collect these particles but sometimes do not cope with the task."

"Filings and chips also cause irregular wear or seizure of the oil pressure relief valve. This type of defect can occur fairly soon, in cars with not more than 30–40 thousand km (18k-25k miles) on the odometer."


For reference, here's a pic of the trans pan magnets when I did the service @ 72k:



Nice thick coating of magnetic goo, but no metal bits that look like glitter.
 

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Hey can I ask why you recommend not using Mopar Tranmission fluid? I bought my Jeep Patriot used at 106,000 miles for around $4K FWD , I haven't serviced the transmission fluid but I do the tune up every 6,000 miles. I've been considering getting the transmission oil change with a dealer but I haven't made up my mind yet.
 

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Hey can I ask why you recommend not using Mopar Tranmission fluid? I bought my Jeep Patriot used at 106,000 miles for around $4K FWD , I haven't serviced the transmission fluid but I do the tune up every 6,000 miles. I've been considering getting the transmission oil change as a dealer but I haven't made up my mind yet.
I strongly suggest you change the transmission fluid and filters ASAP. The owners manual is misleading (or downright wrong). Transmission should be serviced in the 50-60,000 mile range, so really it is overdue.
 

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Hey can I ask why you recommend not using Mopar Tranmission fluid?
Sure.

It's Nissan NS-2 compatible; the NS-2 spec was developed over a decade ago. It never held up that well (IMO), was expensive and available only from dealers or online.

The other fluids I mentioned all have better specs, and from what I've seen people that tried them have had good results. Castrol Transmax is around $5-ish a quart depending on where you get it, Valvoline is around $9-10 and specs a little better than Castrol, Amsoil costs more than the other two but also specs better.
 

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I am looking at a 2014 Patriot High Altitude 2.0 with 47K miles for 9937.00.
I love it, but I'm concerned about a CTV transmission.
What do I need to know?
My CVT on my 2016 FDII is still performing fine at 62000 miles, and I have done some very mild off-roading. I will have it serviced soon though at the dealership. It is noisier than a traditional Auto though. I would agree with all the replys that say to have a filter and fluid change when you buy it, you don't know if it saw hard use as a Lyft/Uber cab in the past. Just to be on the safe side. CVT's generally have the gas mileage advantage over standard autos also.
 

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I will have it serviced soon though at the dealership.
Chris, most dealers will not replace the Cooler filter. They call it lifetime... They will replace the Course screen filter in the pan but not the fine Cooler filter, they let that get clog up and burn out your CVT. love that planned obsolescence...
 
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