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Yeah. Big mistake.

I use a color match wax. I had an altercation with a barbed wire fence several years ago that was hidden in some brush and left scratches all along one side down to the primer. I used colored wax and it fills in just fine. I just have to reapply every few months.

The more risky method is to use a finer compound such as the scratch repair kits you see at the auto parts stores. You see it advertised on TV with seemingly great results. Keep in mind those kits are just very fine abrasives and they will remove more paint, and you've already lost a lot. Some even say on the label that they 'blend' the surrounding paint: meaning they are dissolving the surrounding paint and using it to fill in the scratches. Each time you use such a product your paint is gradually getting thinner and eventually you will have noticeable light spots.
 

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I hate swirl marks.:censored:

Last year left my XJ at the Jeep dealer for a front end alignment after ball joint replacements.
I was surprised it was washed and looked good when i picked it up.
That is until i got home and looked at it in the sunlight.
Dam kids at the dealer swirled the hell out of my Jeep.

I picked up some Meguirar's SwirlX swirl remover.
That stuff got rid of all the swirls and when finished my Jeep's paint looked factory fresh again.

I'd start out with something light like a swirl remover.
Make sure your Jeep is squeaky clean before the swirl remover procedure and follow directions.
Instead of using the swirl remover in circular patterns, i found it worked out better with more straight up/down rubbing patterns.

Yes, its gonna take some elbow grease....no pain, no gain!

Now i demand no washing of any of my vehicles at this Jeep dealership or any other dealership.
 

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Mequires Ultimate Polish and Ultimate Compound are user friendly homeowner versions of their professional 205/105 combo. If memory serves, the ultimate products have more oils in them and can be applied by hand or machine.

Here's a link showing the abrasive scale of their products: Aggressiveness Order for New Consumer Products - This will surprise you! ...Ultimate Polish (not shown) is similar to the 205, with more oils and less cut.

Using the correct applicators also is important. Even using the wrong type of applicator and removal cloths during detailing can mar some paints. What the others have stated: removing swirls is done by removing some of the clear coat. Be careful, maybe even take it to a pro. Always try the least abrasive product first and work up the scale.

After 3 decades of Chrysler product care in a harsh environment, my impression has been that MOPAR has very good paint quality. I read some forums where people complain about other brands having thin, soft, and/or easily chipped/scratched paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just finished using the Scratch Doctor, followed up with a coat of Nufinish polish. I did the entire hood and am quite pleased with the results. I'd estimate about half of the scratches/ swirl marks have been eliminated.
 

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Just like washing your face...dirt reappears later. So I'll reapply...only took 10 minutes. No big deal.
Yes, but as I said, each time the paint gets a little thinner. That's the kind of product you use the day you sell it. A week later the buyer says to himself, Hmm, I never noticed those scratches when I bought it . . .
 

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When you say color match wax, is it as simple as buying black off the shelf or did you have the dealership color match a wax for you in the same way they can do the paint?
Thank you in advance for the advice. I just brought home my Jeep Patriot today and going to try my best to keep the black paint looking good.
 

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First off, if you don't have scratches, just use a regular wax. On black paint you may find a white wax leaves a white residue highlighting any scratches. I think Meguiars makes a black wax that shouldn't do that.

I got my colored wax at an auto parts store. Because my Patriot is red, I use a red wax that fills in the scratches temporarily. All scratch repair is temporary, and it will have to be repeated.

Because it needs to be repeated, I would never use a color-blend wax. The "one-wax-does-all" are color blenders. As I said in a previous post above, all color blenders do is dissolve some of the surrounding paint to cover the scratch the same way a colored wax would. The blender wax borrows paint from the surrounding area but never pays back its loan, eventually leaving you with a light spot. :( The difference is the colored wax provides its own color.
 

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When you say color match wax, is it as simple as buying black off the shelf or did you have the dealership color match a wax for you in the same way they can do the paint?
Thank you in advance for the advice. I just brought home my Jeep Patriot today and going to try my best to keep the black paint looking good.
Oh, hey, you're new here! Welcome to the forum. Please drop by the newbie threads and introduce yourself to the others. We've got a great bunch on here. Glad to have ya. :)
 

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When you say color match wax, is it as simple as buying black off the shelf or did you have the dealership color match a wax for you in the same way they can do the paint?
Thank you in advance for the advice. I just brought home my Jeep Patriot today and going to try my best to keep the black paint looking good.
Black is very difficult to maintain. Go to some auto detailing sites and study how to properly wash and detail your paint. Yes, wrong washing technique can put micro scratches in your paint (swirls) that really show up on black. Correct wash towels, the 2 bucket method, proper application/removal cloths for the wax/sealant. Some cheap micro fiber can scratch your paint.

Many commercial car washes put micro scratches (swirls) in the paint. I avoid them entirely.
 

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Black is very difficult to maintain. Go to some auto detailing sites and study how to properly wash and detail your paint. Yes, wrong washing technique can put micro scratches in your paint (swirls) that really show up on black. Correct wash towels, the 2 bucket method, proper application/removal cloths for the wax/sealant. Some cheap micro fiber can scratch your paint.

Many commercial car washes put micro scratches (swirls) in the paint. I avoid them entirely.
Hi, I too have the black Patriot and pesky swirl marks....I love how it looks when all shined up, but didn't realize how truly difficult it is to keep a black vehicle looking sharp! I'm always paranoid my microfibers or products or techniques are putting more micro-scratches in it, I'll keep doing research, good to have found this site.
 

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One of the reasons early automobiles were painted black was to show off the finish and bodywork. Black would show up problems more easily than other colors.

I suppose any polishing, even washing, involves contact with the paint and given enough time and repetition the paint will begin to show the wear. Microfibers may be easier on the paint the the harsher alternatives, but you're right -- sooner or later it will do some damage, even if only micro-damage.

I had a red Oldsmobile that got scratched up pretty badly by a car wash and one burned is twice shy. I've only had one black car and I never took it through a car wash except the touch-free type (that don't clean very well). Still, scratches happened and I used a black colored wax. I never use color blending waxes -- they are simply abrasives that take paint from the surrounding area and deposit it in the scratch. Use that stuff enough times and you develop a thin spot in the paint.
 
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