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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I’m looking to get a coil lift soon (hopefully) but I have a few questions that maybe you all could help me with.

First, I have a 2016 Sport FWD CVT, and I’ve yet to see anything definitive regarding whether it actually is compatible. I saw a thread where another user had trouble fitting one of the springs due to the CVT getting in the way somehow. So are the Stu coils possible?

Assuming they are, what are the best struts to use? My Patriot is in need of new struts anyway, which is one of the reasons I’m finally considering a lift, so I can just have a mechanic do it all in one go. I saw that rough country has new struts, N3, that go with their lift (are they extended range?). Is there any reason these wouldn’t work with the Stu coils too? If they don’t, then what are the best struts to use?

Any other issues or parts I should consider?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply Sandstone, one reason I considered the Stu’s is that most people seem to prefer the firmer ride it provides. You’re probably right that the Stu’s might be more trouble and expense than they’re worth for my purposes. I just want to basically make my Jeep a road trip vehicle with dirt road capability. Nothing crazy.

I do run 225/70r16 AT’s, which are about an inch bigger than stock (.5” lift) and for the most part they’ve been great. They rubbed slightly from the start on U turns and such, but I’ve noticed lately that they are rubbing a lot more, which I figured has to be that the front struts are wearing out.

If not a lift, do you have any suggestions on stiffer aftermarket struts? Would I be able to use 4x4 struts?

Ultimately I was planning a Stu lift with 235/70r16 tires with aftermarket wheels that have 4.59 backspacing / +13mm offset. But maybe just better struts with the same wheel/tire package would be a better option.
 

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Ok, if it's mostly road trips and graded dirt roads as opposed to trails the larger tires may be all you need.

The stock springs/struts aren't real strong and over time will sag especially in the back when loaded down.
A good set of aftermarket springs along with new struts would make a difference, along with a new set of upper rear control arms if the bushings are worn.

Take a read through this thread on Moog after market springs:

KYB struts were popular with some members.

I have Stu's and Monroe struts (got them cheap with a rebate) and the ride is firmer than stock (which I like) but if I were to do it again I'd consider using Bilstein.


I think this is the only member here so far that's used them, but they seemed to like them

Looking at the Monroe catalog, the the 4wd and Fwd use the same part numbers, so I'd imagine the Bilsteins will fit both as well but I'd probably ask anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Sandstone, sorry for the late response. I appreciate the advice. I went ahead and took your advice and ordered the Bilsteins, they seem to be the same part for FWD and 4x4. I also ordered the Moog springs, 81481 and 81482. They’re 4x4 springs, which may or may not provide a .5” lift, it’s a little unclear. But I can’t imagine they’ll pose an issue with such a modest lift seeing as the Stu’s are 2” lifts.

My cousin is going to help me with the install soon, but before I show up to his place I need to figure out if I need anything else. I thought I’d be transferring most parts from the old struts, but it seems like it may be better to replace other components as well since I don’t know what else might be worn out. What else do you recommend when doing a job like this? Should I just get all new strut components (what would they be?) and build out the struts to make it a quick and easy swap out?
 

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I'm not sure what all the Bilstein kit come with, but I would replace any rusty hardware and rubber parts like the rear isolators (#9) and bushing #7 and #4, the front strut mounts (#4) and strut bearing (#5).
The front strut bearing is a hard plastic ring that will wear and when it gets too thin it allows the spring plate to bind on the strut mount when you turn the wheel. If not fixed it will eventually ruin/break the tie rod ends.

Though you may not really need it, you might consider adding camber adjustment bolts to the front.

Rear
94230


Front
94231
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Awesome, that’s great info! What about bump stops? I should’ve included this in the OP, but Patriot is at ~90k miles, I bought it at 36k. So I’m assuming some stuff is ready to be replaced. I’m CA though, so probably no rusty hardware.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry, the terminology on a lot of these parts is a bit vague. Makes it hard to search for specific parts. I guess it’s called a jounce bumper? It’s #11 in the first diagram. The front had them too, but the dust bellow and bumper aren’t included in that diagram for some reason.

Side note, why the heck do they make it so difficult to get individual strut components? Why does nobody offer a full strut hardware + rubber rebuild kit?

I know I’m probably overthinking this. My Jeep isn’t that old, it’s the last true model year, so I’m betting that when I take it apart I’ll find that most parts are actually fine.
 
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