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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've gone cross-eyed with all the reading I've done about CVTs on this site. I am not looking for any "how tos" on changing the fluid. You guys have provided ample information on this. I am struggling with "should I change it?" (2010 w/ 138K), "should I do it myself?" and "where can I get the parts that the dealers apparently don't sell?"

Local dealers are all over the board about servicing CVTs. One says "we don't recommend service as they tend to have problems afterward." Another wants $320 for drain and fill - no strainer replacement (even though there is no drain plug). I suspect they will siphon out and replace fluid. For full pan drop, clean, strainer and refill they say in $600 range. Have not found a dealer that can or will replace the paper cartridge on the cooler. Really leaning toward doing this myself.

Two questions: 1) I have found the aftermarket filter cartridges for the cooler, but cannot find the gasket/o-ring. Have most been able to reuse the existing one or can you lead me to a replacement part? and 2) What have the experiences been with non-OEM fluid? I know Castrol and Valvoline have full synthetics that are stated as "suitable" for CVTF+4 replacement/use. However, I don't want to mix colors of fluid, if possible. CVTF+4 is green, right?

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I looked around and wasn't able to find the o-ring that goes between the transmission and the aux cooler/thermal bypass (cooler filter is located inside the trans. behind these) by itself. Seems it's only offered along with the replacement part.

I ended up re-using the o-ring, and used Valvoline (pale green in color) for the drain and refill. No problems yet.
 

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I have 131K on my 2008 with CVT and have changed the fluid 3 times since 84K when I got the CVT whine. I replaced my stock pan with one that has a drain plug and drain and refill the fluid every 30K. 120K is way too long to go. I would not go over 60K.

I've used Valvoline the first two times and Castrol the last time two months ago.

No problems with either fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, here is what I ended up doing. I warmed the transmission and placed the rear tires on ramps. I used a fluid extractor to take out 3+ quarts of fluid out the dipstick tube. I drained the fluid into a measuring container and let it come to room temperature. I replaced the exact amount of fluid that came out of the transmission with fresh Valvoline CVT fluid. I figured this was the safest and easiest method to get some new fluid in the system without messing with temps and levels, blah, blah. I know it would be ideal to clean the magnets and strainer along with the fluid change but magnets keep working when dirty and the strainer is just metal mesh. Anyway, I'm planning on doing a couple of these over the next few months to get as much replaced as possible. At a minimum, new fluid can't be a bad thing.....right?
 

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The new fluid might help if you're having problems with the fluid foaming and whining due to the breakdown of the fluids anti-foaming agents.

You're right that the magnets are still magnetic even when "dirty". But at 138k they've probably collected as many metal filings as they can hold, and the rest will circulate in the system until they get stuck in the sides of the aluminum valve body, jammed in the bearings, or caught by the paper cooler filter, which will eventually become restricted/clogged and doesn't have a bypass.

This is what the filter from my Patriot looked like @72k compared to a new one:



If possible I would try to get the filter changed.
 

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I can’t find the CVT oil capacity anywhere. I have a 2010 Patriot. Dropped the pan and it had exactly 5.5 quarts. I put exactly 5.5 back in. Does 5.5 quarts sound right?
 

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Per the service manual, a drain and fill with filter change is 14.8 pints, or 7.4 quarts.

Putting back exactly what came out won't tell you if the level is correct unless you knew for certain the level was correct before you did the change.

After the drain and fill, the fluid level needs to be measured via the fill tube and the level (in mm) checked against the chart to verify proper fluid level.

There's really no shortcut for this.





https://www.justanswer.com/jeep/6sm05-jeep-patriot-limited-07-patriot-transmission-fluid-chek.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, Sandstone, you just scared me into doing a full change as well as filters. I'm not having ANY issues that I can tell and keep thinking, "if it ain't broke..." I know. Stupid. I think I found the cooler O-ring on Ebay listed under Nissan parts. Some of the hose connections look different, but the main body of the cooler has to be the same. I can't imagine that Jatco would reconfigure the case of their transmissions for different coolers. Also, are you using an infrared thermometer to determine your transmission temps on the pan or just filling to a "univeral" level like 36mm that covers all temp ranges? I have the Torque app and have tried to configure for transmission temps on the Patriot, but none of the configurations have worked for me.

Oh, I am curious how much fluid comes out when you remove the face of the transmission cooler?

O-ring listing:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/EPDM-O-RIN...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649
 

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Ok, Sandstone, you just scared me into doing a full change as well as filters. I'm not having ANY issues that I can tell and keep thinking, "if it ain't broke..." I know. Stupid. I think I found the cooler O-ring on Ebay listed under Nissan parts. Some of the hose connections look different, but the main body of the cooler has to be the same. I can't imagine that Jatco would reconfigure the case of their transmissions for different coolers. Also, are you using an infrared thermometer to determine your transmission temps on the pan or just filling to a "univeral" level like 36mm that covers all temp ranges? I have the Torque app and have tried to configure for transmission temps on the Patriot, but none of the configurations have worked for me.

Oh, I am curious how much fluid comes out when you remove the face of the transmission cooler?

O-ring listing:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/EPDM-O-RING-Seal-Gasket-Fits-Nissan-overheating-CVT-Transmission-Oil-Cooler/173330313370?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649
Got the PM, sorry for the late reply.

I understand where you're coming from, Not wanting to take it apart isn't stupid, I don't like tearing things apart unless I really, really need to. It wasn't until I came across some service/repair info that I really understood I needed to do the whole thing sooner rather than later.

Here's three links that talk about the problems with metal filing build up:

CVT Success: In-Vehicle Isolation of Common Problems

"The first false assumption has to do with the magnets. A certain amount of magnetic fuzz is normal in a CVT inspected with 40 to 50 thousand miles. The push-belt links create fretting where they contact the sheave/pulley surface, most of which is generated during break-in. But in noting this material is normal, consider that much of that ferrous fuzz has been circulating throughout the valve body. It has embedded into the solenoids and stuck onto the speed sensors — all of which are electromagnets — while also scrubbing away at the aluminum valve bores. This means that the fuzz is indeed normal, but so is low-mileage valve bore wear."

JF011E, RE0F06A, RE0F10A

"The most expensive repair of CVT happens when the pressure in the system drops. The reason for this is the chips and coating of the pressure relief valve in the CVT pump.The oil pump RE0F10A / JF011E is the most vulnerable part of the CVT. The cover of the pressure relief valve is torn off, the valve is jammed is in a hot state. Further, because of low pressure, the belt RE0F10A / JF011E is erased. The shavings from the belt and the pulleys get into the valve body, and the car with the buzzing sound stops with the pressure errors in the pulleys. In this case, the oil pump, CVT belt and valve body are replaced. If the pulleys are erased, the set of pulleys is also replaced."

"Oil is replaced in the RE0F10A / JF011E CVT every 60 000 km (approx.37k mi) together with the internal and external filters (located under the heat exchanger). After removing the cooler, it is necessary to replace the rubber ring."

Jatco JF015E: a CVT That Is Crazy About Cleanliness - The AKPPro Magazine

"Harmful Filings
A common complaint of the car owner is irregular motion, kicks at acceleration. There may be several reasons behind this kind behavior of a car. However, virtually all of them have to do with oil contamination with the pulley debris – metal chips or filings can create a variety of problems. There are magnets in the crankcase to mitigate harmful effects of these metal particles, they have to collect these particles but sometimes do not cope with the task."

"Filings and chips also cause irregular wear or seizure of the oil pressure relief valve. This type of defect can occur fairly soon, in cars with not more than 30–40 thousand km on the odometer."


For reference, here's a pic of the trans pan magnets when I did the service:



Nice thick coating of magnetic goo.


For measuring the temp I use a scan gauge II. When driving around on a hot day the trans temp can read anywhere from 180 to around 200 degrees. At that temp, the level I like to see is around 38-39mm so it doesn't foam and whine.

If I remember right, I think I got a little less than a teaspoon of fluid when I took the cooler off

And nice find on the O-ring! I agree, it should fit since the base plates on the Nissan cooler are the same. Or at least it looks that way to me. For $17 it's well worth a try.
 

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Got the PM, sorry for the late reply.

I understand where you're coming from, Not wanting to take it apart isn't stupid, I don't like tearing things apart unless I really, really need to. It wasn't until I came across some service/repair info that I really understood I needed to do the whole thing sooner rather than later.
Sandstone, Just wanted to take a moment to thank you for all of your posts on this topic. Your patience and willingness to help others is inspiring. This topic comes up a lot, and you are always there to offer technical and moral support. Thank you.
 

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I know this thread has gone 2 years without a post, but I wanted to contribute some findings, to be even more helpful than this post was for me. I have a 2011 Patriot with 97900 miles.

I had two problems that I thought were both CVT related: overheating transmission and jerky acceleration around 35-45 mph. I changed the CVT fluid and both filters. The overheating has not recurred, but then it has not been put to a real test. The jerky acceleration remained. Spoiler alert: The cause for that turned out to be worn out spark plugs. This was a $12 and 30-minute fix, and I took my time. :)
92418


Sandstone's posts on 20 July and 21 July 2018 were spot-on. I drained approximately 7.5 quarts of CVT fluid that was dark enough to look like a good milk stout, but didn't smell burned. My magnets had about a 2mm coating of metallic goo. The bottom of the pan and the in-pan filter/strainer had a light coating of grayish goo. The paper filter in the cooler connection housing was just as black and dirty as shown in the post above.

If you are measuring the fluid level with some sort of dipstick or rod, be aware that the "bottom" the earlier posts refer to is actually the bottom of a cage or slotted tube structure than extends downward into the pan area of the housing. It does not refer to the bottom of the pan. By my measurement, there is approximately 56mm from the bottom of the cage to the bottom of the pan. Just something to be aware of.
92419


I put back 7 quarts of Valvoline CVT-4 (Mopar rated) fluid and checked my stick. It showed 30-35mm on the stick at 80-85F, engine running. It was very difficult for me to see a precise level line, mostly I think because of the spreading properties of the CVT fluid, but I was confident the level was between the minimum and maximum curves in Sandstone's graph. I can top off the last 0.4 qt as needed.

Be very careful tightening up the pan bolts in a good cross-pan sequence. I don't have a torque wrench for small fasteners, so I "snuck up" on the torque, and I had a few weeps before getting it all tight enough. I used the new gasket that came with the internal filter/strainer.

Also very helpful was this youtube video:

I was fortunate to have found some documentation for my problems. Another JP forum post clued me into the spark plug fix. I wanted to add some clarity and additional documentation to help others. Certainly there is an overall, general lack of that online.
 

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I had to chime in after seeing your pics of the spark plugs. I bought a non running 2010 Patriot with 259k on it July of 19, a $500 project for my kids first car. While I was waiting on brown Santa to bring me a used Mopar starter I decided to check some of the usual maintenance things people don't do. Coolant was almost non existent, the oil change I drained 1.5qts and put 5qts back in, and the spark plug gaps were over .80 :oops: It's no wonder the starter gave up, this thing was tortured!

Fortunately it started right up with the new/used starter, new battery, and maintenance mentioned previously. After a couple weeks of driving it also got a rear wheel bearing, front pads and rotors, struts all around, front lower A-arms with ball joints, various suspension parts/bushings front and rear, a serpentine belt, a thermostat housing, and a catalytic converter to get rid of the check engine light. It then becomes the kids daily for school, work, and play with no further major issues.

Fast forward to this July the kid wants to go on a 1000 mile road trip with it to visit his older brother so I put new tires on it and cross my fingers. He calls me once on the way there and once on the way back to let me know it's going into limp mode due to transmission overheating. So like everyone else on here I start reading endless posts trying to figure out the issue. I order the pan filter, the cooler filter, and 6qts of CVT+4 and finally get around to changing the fluid today, it now has 266K on it.

I didn't bother ordering a dipstick, I just used the engine oil dipstick, after cleaning it of course. I've come across several people that have done this and they claim the trans fluid level hits the bottom of the "safe" mark on the dipstick when properly filled. The pan still had the metal gasket on it so either its never been serviced or it was last done by a dealer. Nothing unusual in the pan, fuzz on the magnets, no chunks, paper filter was black and pretty well plugged. I let it drain for about 30min, cleaned everything up and threw it back together, then dumped in the 6qts. Checked the fluid level with the oil dipstick, yep, just under the "safe" area. I took it for a test run, no surprises, drives just like before. Only time will tell if it solved the overheating issue.

Things got strange when I decided to see how much fluid came out, 2.5 gallons or 10qts! :oops: Anyone ever have this much come out? It didn't make strange noises or do anything stupid over the last 7K miles other than the overheating at speeds near 70mph in temps near 90. The old fluid does smell a little burnt but not more then any other used fluid I've smelled. If I start to have issues I'll update the post. Just thought some of you would get a chuckle out of a 10qt drain...
 

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The new fluid might help if you're having problems with the fluid foaming and whining due to the breakdown of the fluids anti-foaming agents.

You're right that the magnets are still magnetic even when "dirty". But at 138k they've probably collected as many metal filings as they can hold, and the rest will circulate in the system until they get stuck in the sides of the aluminum valve body, jammed in the bearings, or caught by the paper cooler filter, which will eventually become restricted/clogged and doesn't have a bypass.

This is what the filter from my Patriot looked like @72k compared to a new one:



If possible I would try to get the filter changed.
Ok, Sandstone, you just scared me into doing a full change as well as filters. I'm not having ANY issues that I can tell and keep thinking, "if it ain't broke..." I know. Stupid. I think I found the cooler O-ring on Ebay listed under Nissan parts. Some of the hose connections look different, but the main body of the cooler has to be the same. I can't imagine that Jatco would reconfigure the case of their transmissions for different coolers. Also, are you using an infrared thermometer to determine your transmission temps on the pan or just filling to a "univeral" level like 36mm that covers all temp ranges? I have the Torque app and have tried to configure for transmission temps on the Patriot, but none of the configurations have worked for me.

Oh, I am curious how much fluid comes out when you remove the face of the transmission cooler?

O-ring listing:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/EPDM-O-RING-Seal-Gasket-Fits-Nissan-overheating-CVT-Transmission-Oil-Cooler/173330313370?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649
Hello!
Does ANYBODY know part number, or dimensions of o'ring gasket????
 
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