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So I am 5 fuel ups in. Figured I would start putting them into fuelly. My MPG are 21.5, 21.6, 20.6, and 21.6.

I was hoping to be up around 25... Not really an aggressive driver and I'd say my ride is probably 80/20 highway. Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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Replace the air filter, check your spark plugs. How many miles do you have? Do you use energy conserving motor oil? In the morning, before you even start your car, what is the PSI in your tires? Make sure it is 35-38 cold PSI
 

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Actually, when considering you have a FD1 with a CVT, and its wintertime with winter blended gas, your 21 MPG avg isn't too bad. My daughter's FWD with a CVT is only getting 23 MPG right now.

I would incorporate Brandon's suggestions, particularly the tire air pressure check, and also try this throttle recalibration to see if it helps:

http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11796
 

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Actually, when considering you have a FD1 with a CVT, and its wintertime with winter blended gas, your 21 MPG avg isn't too bad. My daughter's FWD with a CVT is only getting 23 MPG iright now.

I would incorporate Brandon's suggestions, particularly the tire air pressure check, and also try this throttle recalibration to see if it helps:

http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11796
This is very true, the colder temps, and the fuel blend definitely hurt mileage. I remove the battery cover/fresh air intake on my FDI to let the engine breath slightly warmer engine compartment air. It helps (and it's easy to remove and put back on come spring time).
 

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I always thought it would be better if the car breathed colder air, not warmer air.

What am I misunderstanding here? :doh:
 

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I always thought it would be better if the car breathed colder air, not warmer air.

What am I misunderstanding here? :doh:
Colder air for power, warmer air for economy. In the winter, the air is plenty cold and the slightly warmer air helps offset the winter fuel mix that drops MPG's. I use a ScanGauge II and when I remove the battery cover/air intake, I generally will see a 10 deg. F or more increase in intake air temps over outside (ambient) air temps. If I sit in traffic, it goes higher (like 20-30 deg F over outside temps). Take today for example, It's 37 F outside. I just ran a few errands around town and my intake air temp was 51 F. These engine seem to like slightly warmer air for some reason.
 

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If you aren't, driving so as to keep the RPM below 2500 RPM 98% of the time will make a difference. This will require a light foot on the "gas pedal". Driving 65 max instead of higher will help. Drag goes up with the square of the speed. Also, for what it is worth, adding the roof cross bars, and front and rear grill and bumper gaurds will reduce MPG. Extra weight requires more gas to accelerate and extra stuff in the airflow causes more drag.

I had my roof rack cross bars on for the weekend I needed them and now they are off again.
 

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29.10 MPG is a lot different than what I am getting. I do drive with a light foot, trying to figure it out. Going to check the tires today after work.
 

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Colder air for power, warmer air for economy. In the winter, the air is plenty cold and the slightly warmer air helps offset the winter fuel mix that drops MPG's. I use a ScanGauge II and when I remove the battery cover/air intake, I generally will see a 10 deg. F or more increase in intake air temps over outside (ambient) air temps. If I sit in traffic, it goes higher (like 20-30 deg F over outside temps). Take today for example, It's 37 F outside. I just ran a few errands around town and my intake air temp was 51 F. These engine seem to like slightly warmer air for some reason.
Your ScanGage tells the air intake temperature??? What all does it do? I thought it was simply instant and average mpg
 

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Your ScanGage tells the air intake temperature??? What all does it do? I thought it was simply instant and average mpg
It is a bunch more. I'll let Todd tell all about it except for one thing. I keep a display of Mainifold Air Pressure (MAP) displayed on mine. In simple terms, Maniifold air pressure is a measure of the pressure which is shoving air/fuel mixture into the cylinders. It is displayed in pounds per square inch, PSI. I try to drive to keep the MAP below 11 most of the time. Here in San Antonio with full throttle, it is about 14.2 PSI. At sea level, full throttle would be closer to 15.0 PSI.

The "gas pedal" position is one of the inputs to the computer. I call it the "driver power request". There is no direct connection between the gas pedal and the butterfly valve in the intake. The computer decides how much to open the butterfly valve - "throttle by wire".

Judging by the displayed MAP, the computer typically opens the throttle a lot more than I would expect it to be open in terms of how far I have pushed the gas/accelerator pedal. So I modulate the gas pedal to keep the MAP from exceeding 11.0 on normal acceleration.

When acceloerating, I typically shift into the next higher gear when the RPM gets to 2,500. This is sometimes referred to as "short shifting", since I am shifting to the next higher gear short of an RPM to which I might have revved.

I expect that is a big part of my overall gas mileage. That and the facts that I have the 5 speed manual transmission and do a fair amount of freeway or highway driving. Also, I'm retired, so I'm not going through that much rush hour traffic.

My gas mileage averaged 25.5 for a tank where I had the roof bars and load platform on my Jeep and I was running against a headwind caused by a cold front.
 

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That's about average for 4x4 CVT Patriot. The 5-speed manual transmission with FWD is what is expected to get around 28MPG.
 

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That's about average for 4x4 CVT Patriot. The 5-speed manual transmission with FWD is what is expected to get around 28MPG.
28 hwy.... I think he gave his average for city/highway mix. 25.5 sounds pretty good for a mix

EDIT: I re-read it and it looks like he was referring to highway driving with extra wind against him. You were probably right assuming it was hwy mileage
 

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I've been using my warm air intake and getting 28+ on the highway this winter. 21 city. People claim the 4x2s do better on gas but I'm not seeing many stats above 30 posted here. With a very light foot, and keeping RPMs under 2K I can do 30MPG easy all summer long with my FD1. Even with the sprint booster, (drive by wire amplifier) I get the high mileage numbers Jeep claims.

Do check your tire pressure. Also do the computer reset with the accelerator. A good many people have corrected bad mileage by resetting the computer. Since your car is fairly new, there might be a brake pad that has not worn in yet, and is dragging a little.
 

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So I am 5 fuel ups in.
I seem to recall that it took my Patriot a little longer than this for the fuel consumption to settle down all the way. That was of course three years ago, and weather might have been a factor as well, but I'm thinking you're likely to see improvements as time goes on.
 

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Your ScanGage tells the air intake temperature??? What all does it do? I thought it was simply instant and average mpg
Oh...It might be easier to tell what it doesn't show. Out of the box, it shows a live read out of just about every engine sensor and with programmable X-Gauge commands, I also have O2 sensor AF values, a brake horse power readout. It can check and clear OBDII codes, check for emissions test readiness and yes, give instand and average MPG readings. For $150, it's already paid for it self many times over in helping me fix friends and families cars too. I got mine from here: http://www.scantool.net/scangauge-ii.html They're about the same price as every one else, but for $1 more you can get an extra cable. That let me mount one cable in my jeep semi-permanent, and I can easily pop it out and check other cars with the extra cable.
 

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I'm averaging 19 and change in winter weather, mostly city driving. Not bad, I guess. I'm going to look at changing plugs and the air filter since I don't know if the dealership did it before I bought the Jeep.
 

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Replace the air filter, check your spark plugs. How many miles do you have? Do you use energy conserving motor oil? In the morning, before you even start your car, what is the PSI in your tires? Make sure it is 35-38 cold PSI
Where did you get the 35-38 cold PSI values? The sticker on my door says 32 PSI cold, and that is at GVWR (full load). I agree that a higher tire pressure provides better fuel economy, but it will also cause uneven wear on your tires.



 

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Where did you get the 35-38 cold PSI values? The sticker on my door says 32 PSI cold, and that is at GVWR (full load). I agree that a higher tire pressure provides better fuel economy, but it will also cause uneven wear on your tires.

Interesting that the 215/60R17's get 32psi. I have the 215/65R17's and my door sticker says 35 psi (though I also run 38 psi for a firmer feel).
 

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If you aren't, driving so as to keep the RPM below 2500 RPM 98% of the time will make a difference. This will require a light foot on the "gas pedal". Driving 65 max instead of higher will help. Drag goes up with the square of the speed. Also, for what it is worth, adding the roof cross bars, and front and rear grill and bumper gaurds will reduce MPG. Extra weight requires more gas to accelerate and extra stuff in the airflow causes more drag.

I had my roof rack cross bars on for the weekend I needed them and now they are off again.
I've noticed my mileage is greatly affected by outside air temperature. I'm assuming that air temperatures are consistently warmer in Texas than in Fargo, ND (-3° F right now).

Check out my Fuelly log to see how its dropped off as its gotten colder. My best mileage was over 30 MPG in October when it was 80°F outside, and that was a freeway trip with sustained speeds over 70 mph.

I'm thinking of implementing some sort of warm-air intake, but I'm also suspicious that the poor mileage is also because the engine & drivetrain lubricants aren't getting up to as high of temperature as they do in the summer. My temp gauge is almost vertical in the summer, whereas its 2-tick marks lower during winter driving. The coolant temp should be the same summer/winter with the thermostat, I'll have to check out where its pulling the temp from.
 
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