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Discussion Starter #1
A couple of days ago I had my first disappointment with my 2017 Patriot 4x2. At Lowes I loaded about 500 pounds into the back with the seats down, 15 bags of wet mulch and dirt. The back went down and the front up. If I had to go more than 1.5 miles I would have left half behind. It didn't ride well with that weight. My last vehicle, a 2003 Saturn VUE fwd, rode better with weight than without. So what's the limit or what is the fix.
Thanks,
Sparky62
new to jeeps
 

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I believe 900lbs is the max w/out the towing package; 1800 with the package.

Regardless, your observations are accurate -- the Patriot is not a good vehicle for heavy weight. I carried a load of floor tiles for my kitchen a few weeks ago. I forget the exact calculation but it was around 700lbs, maybe a little over. Add to that my Wife & I, plus other junk that rides around with me, it was probably over 1000 lbs. It was night and the oncoming cars kept flashing their lights at me so I gather my headlights were too high because of the weight. All around, the vehicle did not handle well. Once, not a problem, but if I kept doing it, I'd probably pay a price. I used to put similar loads in my Olds Cutlass wagon on a weekly basis and the suspension was shot by 100,000 miles (2 years).

Don't get me wrong, I love my Patriot(s), but that much weight on the back end was too much for comfort -- for that or any car. Really the MK platform means its a Dodge Caliber wagon. It looks like a truck, but it isn't. My old Cherokee was more capable with heavy loads.
 

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not sure what changed in 2017
my 2007 FDII I used to regularly carry 1000-1500 lbs in the back for work
on almost a weekly basis for about 3 years,
times where I only carried 500 lbs I wouldn't even notice I was carrying the load
short distance of about 5-10 miles, but didn't have a problem with it
sag was minimal and struts held up fine,
I now have +200k miles on my pat and no back end issues, other than bearings replaced last year
 

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After reading Terasec's post, I should mention that my Patriot has over 200,000 miles on it, so it may be getting tired. Maybe a younger Patriot could do better.
 

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Just my personal use, but I rarely carry that much weight in the back of the Patriot. Usually, because bags of mulch and dirt always rip open and I don't want the mess. I save those things for my small utility trailer. I have on many occasions towed my trailer without issue, and many times when crossing the scales at the landfill or recycler my trailer has hit 1750 lbs.
If this is something you plan to do more frequently perhaps a hitch and small trailer would be a good investment.
 
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A couple of days ago I had my first disappointment with my 2017 Patriot 4x2. At Lowes I loaded about 500 pounds into the back with the seats down, 15 bags of wet mulch and dirt. The back went down and the front up. If I had to go more than 1.5 miles I would have left half behind. It didn't ride well with that weight. My last vehicle, a 2003 Saturn VUE fwd, rode better with weight than without. So what's the limit or what is the fix.
Thanks,
Sparky62
new to jeeps
IIRC, the 4x2's have a different set of springs than the 4x4's which are taller for clearance and a little stiffer to handle the added weight of the 4x4 rear diff, etc. .

You could try adding a set of stiffer/taller 4x4 springs in the back. STUcoils used to make a set of heavy duty rear springs, but I'm not sure if they still offer them.

http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/16-suspension-tires/56130-[updated-pictures]-rear-hd-crdstu-coils-murchison-products.html
 

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Just my personal use, but I rarely carry that much weight in the back of the Patriot. Usually, because bags of mulch and dirt always rip open and I don't want the mess. I save those things for my small utility trailer. I have on many occasions towed my trailer without issue, and many times when crossing the scales at the landfill or recycler my trailer has hit 1750 lbs.
If this is something you plan to do more frequently perhaps a hitch and small trailer would be a good investment.
A trailer is a tiny investment compared to a pick-up truck. I'd say what I paid for it is about half a single month's payment on a truck. I only need it once in a while -- the rest of the time it sits behind my garage. If I really, really, really need a truck, I can rent one. That's happened about a dozen times in my life.

Better yet, find a friend who will let you borrow his truck and then take both families out for pizza afterwards!
 

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A trailer is a tiny investment compared to a pick-up truck. I'd say what I paid for it is about half a single month's payment on a truck. I only need it once in a while -- the rest of the time it sits behind my garage. If I really, really, really need a truck, I can rent one. That's happened about a dozen times in my life.

Better yet, find a friend who will let you borrow his truck and then take both families out for pizza afterwards!
I use my trailer frequently. Where I live, there is no trash pick up. So, I have to haul it to the landfill or recycling center. That typically means weekly trips with the trailer as I don't put garbage in the back of my patriot either. I bought my 4x8 utility trailer used on craigslist. I paid a total of 300 bucks for the trailer and the title/registration fees. Amortize that out over the last four years and it's even cheaper. My neighbor has borrowed it several times to use for trips to the lumber yard. At this point, even if I had a pick up truck I would feel lost without the trailer.....
Oh and an annual repack of the hubs and bearings is all the maintenance it has required. Perhaps eventually I may need to replace a tire, but that seems like a long ways off with the use it sees.
Just having to replace the rear suspension springs or struts of my Patriot would cost me as much or more than what I paid for the trailer.....
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I've had a couple of pickups. I liked them, but the Patriot is pretty much what I need right now. I have a "Trailer in a Bag" (an original ) that I'll carry in the back. Then the Patriot will be my "motorcycle rescue vehicle". I ride older Yamahas and if something breaks I can just call my wife. She doesn't have to mess with a utility trailer. A couple of years ago my FJ1200 broke one of it's four throttle cables. There was no roadside fix.
I'll be getting another utility trailer when I can find a bargain like the last one. Thanks for the link to the springs. I might look into that also.
Sparky62
 

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A trailer is a tiny investment compared to a pick-up truck. I'd say what I paid for it is about half a single month's payment on a truck. I only need it once in a while -- the rest of the time it sits behind my garage. If I really, really, really need a truck, I can rent one. That's happened about a dozen times in my life.

Better yet, find a friend who will let you borrow his truck and then take both families out for pizza afterwards!
Good points. But in my recent internet search for testosterone boosters, pickup trucks were listed, utility trailers were not. LOL. I found my previous mini vans to be the most practical and versatile vehicles I ever owned (excluding babe magnet duty).
 

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Good points. But in my recent internet search for testosterone boosters, pickup trucks were listed, utility trailers were not. LOL. I found my previous mini vans to be the most practical and versatile vehicles I ever owned (excluding babe magnet duty).
Yep, truth to this. Our AWD minivan was a great vehicle. With snow tires it handled any storms I encountered including the time I followed the plow up the mountain and then it turned off. Leaving me to blaze a trail in the minivan alone, with the snow so deep it was billowing over the hood as I drove.

With the seats removed it cold haul so much more than the Patriot and didn't have that tiny back hatch opening like the Patriot. I could also throw in a full size (or was in twin) mattress to sleep in it while camping.

Minivan had more horsepower, and better fuel economy as well as being more comfortable.

To me the only advantage of the Patriot is it's much better off-road capability. Was out in the wetlands yesterday with the jeep. Had to take a small,steep, bank at an angle in 4WD and despite some wheels in the air the little jeep's BLD system just took me right up and over.
 

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Good points. But in my recent internet search for testosterone boosters, pickup trucks were listed, utility trailers were not. LOL. I found my previous mini vans to be the most practical and versatile vehicles I ever owned (excluding babe magnet duty).
That's because unlike a pickup truck, the utility trailer has no horsepower or torque rating. The testosterone boosters go on or in the utility trailer..... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
UPDATE:
Today I left Lowes with at least 800 pounds in the back and there was no problem. The difference was the loading. I had help the first time and the weight was too far back. Today I put the first 600 pounds in front of or on the rear axle. Front stayed down and it rode well.

Thanks for your help and insight.
Still going to look at those springs
Sparky62
 

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UPDATE:
Today I left Lowes with at least 800 pounds in the back and there was no problem. The difference was the loading. I had help the first time and the weight was too far back. Today I put the first 600 pounds in front of or on the rear axle. Front stayed down and it rode well.
Yeah, my load was pretty much to the back. Like in your case, the store people loaded my Patriot -- when the back was full we flipped the seats and the last few cases went there. As a result the weight was skewed well to the rear so the body sagged in back pointing my low-beam headlights right into the oncoming traffic. :( Presently, we're moving and our Patriots are making frequent trips with whatever fits in back. No problems with either.
 

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UPDATE:
Today I left Lowes with at least 800 pounds in the back and there was no problem. The difference was the loading. I had help the first time and the weight was too far back. Today I put the first 600 pounds in front of or on the rear axle. Front stayed down and it rode well.

Same here, 750 lbs of concrete stepping stones ( middle seats down, plywood strips protecting the floor ) distributed front to back and the rear only sank 1 1/2 in. compared to the front. Rode and handled fine
considering the load.
 
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