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Discussion Starter #1
The rear tow hook uses the same frame mounting holes as the hitch. use the right bolts (M12 X 120 mm), and you can use both - hitch on the inside of the frame and hook on the outside of the frame


Just install the tow hook back onto your Jeep! The hitch doesn't interfere with it, but you'll need to press the bolts out of the tow hook. This can be done with a vice and a block of wood with a 3/4" hole drilled into it.

Use M12X120 (12 mm dia X 120 mm long) bolts to replace the stock tow hook bolts. The bolts that came with your hitch might be 5/8" bolts, unless it's a Valley hitch. The Valley Class III 2" hitch comes with M12 bolts to attach it to the frame.


M12 X 120 mm bolts are a couple bucks at the most.

91180A723 @ www.mcmaster.com for $2.70 each



The stock hooks have a bolt pressed into them. By pressed, I mean it's a press fit, thus the bolt is tightly squeezed into the tow hook.

You can remove the bolt by putting the hook in a bench vice, and supporting the backside of the hook (where the head of the bolt is) with some wood and then squeezing the bolt out of the hook by compressing the threaded end.

 

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I went to Uhaul to see if they had a hitch for the Patriot - They were unable to remove the rear tow hook and gave up on it - After reading your diagram - made sense why they couldn't just unbolt it - I removed the nuts off of the hook as well as the third bolt on the outside - I ended up just picking up my hitch from their and doing it myself - Except i still used the stock hook and bolts for now - Not going to do any major trailer hauling but maybe a cargo carrier for a couple of fuel cans - Anyhow used a regular 5/8 socket for the Hook and the uhal bolts required me to use a 15/16 socket - Looks good - I will though do your idea to push out them factory bolts - I don't know the tensil strenght on the stock ones - considering their on the tow hook i would think they would be good for now but deffinetly address the issue before some more trailering takes place - Took me a few minutes considering doing it myself - I had done the vehicle wiring harness months ago...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
my concern for using the factory hook bolts is that they're too short. They're plenty strong, but with the thickness of the hitch and a washer added, the nut was too close to the end of the bolt.

Should a nut come loose, it may fall off before you notice the hitch being loose.
 

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bolts were plenty long enough

I installed my hitch last week and the tow hook bolts were plenty long enough. It may be the fact that the hook was added on. I had about a 1/4 inch of thread sticking out past the nuts. Like I said I don't know if the bolts are the same length as of the assembly line, but they worked.
 

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I purchased a longer grade 8 bolt which is for suspension and other high stress use. You can use a thread locker liquid but the nut should go fully on the threads with at least 1/8" to 1/4" of the threads exposed to ensure the nut is past the slight taper at the threaded end of the bolt.
 

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I purchased a longer grade 8 bolt which is for suspension and other high stress use. You can use a thread locker liquid but the nut should go fully on the threads with at least 1/8" to 1/4" of the threads exposed to ensure the nut is past the slight taper at the threaded end of the bolt.
You shouldnt use a grade 8 for towing applications.

Go with Grade 5.

Grade 8 will snap if jarred, and thats a good chance of happening when towing. Grade 5 has just enough flex, yet is strong enough to hold any weight you'd tow behind the pat.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
A properly tightened (torqued) grade 8 bolt will always be stronger than a grade 5.

230 ft-lbs for a 5/8" Grade 8 (although this is excessive IMO)

79 ft-lbs for a M12 Class 8.8




Shear Strength of a hex head cap screw is calculated at 60% of Tensile
strength by industrial engineers.
This is applied to Grade 2, 5 & 8.
Speaking in very general terms, the higher the Grade the higher the carbon
content and through heat treating the 5's & 8's the higher the strength
level, but also the higher the "brittleness." The lower strength bolts are
more "ductile" (have more stretch) than the higher strengths.

PROPERLY TIGHTENED Grade 8's provide the strongest of these three.

It may seem odd but Grade 8's break far more often from under tightening than overtightening in a joint that experiences cyclical loading stresses (typical of automotive
applications). What happens with with a Grade 8 in an undertightened
joint, the bolt is subject to cyclical loading because the joint material is
moving and being more brittle it "fatigues" (breaks, like bending a paper
clip back and forth) easier. Generally the Grade 8 bolts you see broken are
probably from fatigue failure due to undertightening, not from a single
application of force. If it was from a single application of force, the
Grade 5 would fail sooner. A joint properly tightened with a Grade 8 will be
significantly stronger than a Grade 5. Don't even ask about torque/tension
relationships!
 

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tow hook hard metal

Wow, the tow hook was hard to drill through. I just installed a Hidden Hitch and decided to use the 5/8" bolts and keep my tow hook, used a sledge to pop the bolts out against an open vise. Had to have a buddy drill it at the shop, be careful the tollerance is tight. I had to file it some to get it to fit back and also tapped with a hammer. I should have bought some longer bolts, not much sticking past but at least it went past the nut. Be sure to put the wiring in first. Just use 2 flat screwdrivers to pop up the middle of the fastener for the lights and pull the center out first, then the seated part. (see photos)

On my FDII '09 it is all hooked to the 2 lights, no wire to the fuse box - that was the harness that comes with the FDII package. On the driver/left side in the light you remove the big rubber grommet and there is an additional wire taped in there. Hook it into the harness and then I suppose you could cut off the old grommet - I just pushed it through with all the connectors after wrapping them in the supplied foam pads, install the new rubber grommet.

Be careful with the push things that attach the harness to the bumper, some of the points did not line up and one could not be moved because it was on the wrong side of the T where the pigtail goes to the 4-way plug. I did not use all that were on the wire, could not find every point on the passenger/right side.

Most of the connections will be rather apparent and straighforward once you get the lights off and see them live instead of the drawings in the directions. Be sure to route them between the bumper facia and the fasteners that attache the bottom of the facia to the substructure.

It should have took 2 hours but took me a lot longer because I had to keep filiing the tow hook holes until it sort of fit.
 

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Finished Hidden Hitch

Forgot to add a picture of the finished product. You do lose the few inches where it is below the facia, the Mopar hitch has to be cut through the facia and I'm not sure if it comes in a 2" or not.
 

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Finished Hidden Hitch

Sorry, wrong photo on the last reply, here it is.
 

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Forgot to add a picture of the finished product. You do lose the few inches where it is below the facia, the Mopar hitch has to be cut through the facia and I'm not sure if it comes in a 2" or not.
You are right, thhe Mopar hidden hitch is not a 2 inch.
 

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Hidden Hitch Rear Receiver Installation for FDII

I just installed a Hidden Hitch (model 87422) rear receiver hitch on my FDII, following their instructions for installation, which were very good. The hitch came with four each 5/8-11 x 4.5 in bolts and 5/8-11 nuts, two each 5/8” conical washers and two each 5/8” lock washers. I first unbolted the tow hook (5/8”socket) on the drivers-side and punched the bolts out using a vice as Heckler suggested using his drawing as a model.
Rather than drill out the existing holes to 5/8” on the rear tow hook after removal, I followed Heckler’s advice again and used the new M12x120mm hardware for that side. I bought two each M12-1.75 x 120mm Grade 10.9 partially threaded zinc hex head cap screws ($3.01 ea) , 2 each M12-1.75 Z CL8 course threaded hex full nuts ($0.22), one each M12 plain finish conical washer ($0.94), and one each M12 zinc plated lock washer ($0.09) through Fastenal. The passenger’s side used two each of the 5/8” bolts and nuts, and one each of the conical and lock washers supplied with the receiver by Hidden Hitch as listed above.
Bear in mind that the conical washers (concave side in) are used on the two bolts furthest from the rear bumper and the lock washers are used on the two bolts closest to the rear bumper.
Takes two guys to lift but went into place smoothly and all holes lined up perfect. Tightened by hand and then with tools (17mm socket and wrench; 15/16" socket and wrench) in both hands in small tight spaces finally finished tightening all bolts with Locktite (#260) on threads.
 

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Over the years, the general tech inspection criteria for bolt length has been one complete thread rotation showing outside the nut. So, in my experience, a quarter inch (two or two and a half threads) is probably more than necessary.

As Heckler states above, proper torque on stressed fasteners (bolts) is very important for safety and service life. Not too little and not too much. Proper torque for grade five bolt when used on a grade eight bolt will result in premature failure of the grade eight bolt in cycling service. The good and tight method leaves a lot to be desired compared to a torque wrench properly used. Properly used is a smooth application of increasing force until the desired torque is reached, not a jerk.

I installed my hitch by myself. I removed the bumper cover for better access. After getting the center of the plastic rivet/push pins partially retracted, the entire pin assembly can be pulled or pried out. With the bumper cover off, I put the left side of the hitch on the box the hitch came in so that it was elevated. I then loosely installed the short bolt on the right side. I then removed the box and loosely installed the long bolts on the left side. I then loosely installed the long bolts on the right side.

After loosely installing all five fasteners, I tightened them until there was just barely some play. Then one third of final torque on all bolts, then two thirds on all bolts, then final torque. I tightened them in cycles, short bolt on right side, long bolts on left side, long bolts on right side, and repeat.

Link to my install pics and comments.

http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/showthread.php?p=310704

FWIW and YMMV.
 

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my concern for using the factory hook bolts is that they're too short. They're plenty strong, but with the thickness of the hitch and a washer added, the nut was too close to the end of the bolt.

Should a nut come loose, it may fall off before you notice the hitch being loose.

I used the stock tow hook bolts this weekend when installing my Draw-Tite Class III the bolts were plenty long enough. We had enough room to put another nut on as a jam nut to prevent loosening rp
 

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I used the stock tow hook bolts this weekend when installing my Draw-Tite Class III the bolts were plenty long enough. We had enough room to put another nut on as a jam nut to prevent loosening rp
Used my hook bolts on the factory hitch and had plenty of thread remaining. They are substantially thick bolts, I don't worry about them not being tough enough.
 

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I'm installing a Draw Tite hitch on my 09 Patriot. I really want to use the 5/8 bolts provided to mount the hitch. Has anyone successfully drilled out the tow hook. That thing is harder than the hubs of heck. I've tried two bits I had and a new one. :eek:
 

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I installed the draw-tite hitch about a month ago, and I used 5/8's on the right side, and for the left I bought the longer M12x120mm and did not drill the hook out, so that way the tow hook is still usable afterwards. It turned out well
 

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I installed a Curt Class 3 receiver hitch on my wife's 2007 Jeep Patriot Limited aka "Jeep Jeep" some time ago. I had a little trouble with the rear lower plastic panel, but not much and installed the hitch. I will post up the instruction sheet from Curt when I get my MFC back in operation. I hope this will help.
Ben
 
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