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So, on Wednesday evening I was driving home from work on I95 south of D.C. Stuck in the stop and go traffic that plagues the area. At one point I accelerated with the flow of traffic from a near crawl. The Patriot shuddered a bit and then the Check engine light came on. I drove the rest of the way home and put a code scanner on it. Sure enough it was P2004 and P2017 codes. So the intake runner control valve or the butterflies in the manifold were stuck.
The following morning I pulled The "intake runner control valve" cleaned it and worked it back and forth to ensure it was free. Then I cleaned out the intake and worked the intake runner "butterflies" back and forth. Everything felt free, so I put it back together. I had the negative battery terminal off, While doing all this so I put it back on and started up the Patriot. The Check engine light was out. I took it for a 10 mile test ride and the light didn't come back on. Drove to work today 86 miles and it ran good with no lights, no shuddering. Hopefully it will stay that way.
Just thought I would post here. I have 188K on my Patriot and this is the first time I have seen the check engine light. There is a ton of info and posts on this forum about this issue. The one thing to note if you experience this is that the "intake runner control valve" is spring loaded and the tab should turn about 1/4 turn and spring back. The intake runner shaft only turns about 1/8 of a turn and is not spring loaded. If you go to a dealer they don;t spend much time looking into it or trying to clean it up. They will tell you that you need a new intake manifold and quote you 1000 to 1200 dollars to replace it. They just order a new manifold with a new control valve already on it. To get easy access to the control valve, simply remove the large hose going to the air box, unbolt the air box and lay it up on the top cover of the engine. Then disconnect the radiator hose from the upper thermostat housing and lift it up. Use a bungie to hold the radiator hose and air intake hose up out of the way and the control valve is easy to access. Others have posted lots of pictures and even videos in the past. I just wanted to drop a post explaining the difference in movement in the control valve and intake runner shaft because it seems odd that the intake runner shaft only has 1/8 turn of movement and the control valve has twice that. It will make you wonder if the intake runner butterflies are not moving the way they are supposed to. Good luck and I hope if you have this issue you will get as lucky as I did and be able to fix it without spending 150 bucks on a new control valve!
 

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Thanks for the info Aaron, I'm sure it'll come in handy.

I have 188K on my Patriot...
Just curious, have you had any more issues with the transmission (whining, overheat, etc.) since the fluid and filter change?
 

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Thanks for the info Aaron, I'm sure it'll come in handy.



Just curious, have you had any more issues with the transmission (whining, overheat, etc.) since the fluid and filter change?
I have not. Although, I have changed my fluid and filters two more times since I had the dealership do it. I had the initial trans overheat issue around 50K. I had the dealership do a "transmission service" which included fluid and filter replacement. I have done it since. I did it at around 100K just because I thought I should, and then around 150K I noticed that after prolonged highway driving the transmission had an easily audible whine once off the highway and driving on regular streets. The whine was very pronounced during acceleration. So, I changed the fluid and filters again and the whine is no longer there. I'm not sure if the whine I was experiencing was necessarily a bad thing or the fluid really needed to be changed to prevent a recurrence of the trans overheat, but it's easy to do. Also, Walmart now carries CVT-4 fluid and that brought the cost down considerably over buying it from an auto parts retailer. Walmart's pricing is competitive with prices I had seen online.
I see a lot of people on this forum recommend changing the fluid and filters at 60K. I would say that is good advice. I am hoping to keep my Patriot and continue using it as my "commuter" vehicle for a few more years. I am at a point in my life where I really need a heavy duty pickup, but don't want to put daily driver miles on a vehicle that uses that much fuel. So, I will probably be looking to purchase a truck within the next year, but continue using my Patriot as my daily driver. So, at 188K miles now, I am definitely trying to stretch this thing out for another 100K.
 

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So, on Wednesday evening I was driving home from work on I95 south of D.C. Stuck in the stop and go traffic that plagues the area. At one point I accelerated with the flow of traffic from a near crawl. The Patriot shuddered a bit and then the Check engine light came on. I drove the rest of the way home and put a code scanner on it. Sure enough it was P2004 and P2017 codes. So the intake runner control valve or the butterflies in the manifold were stuck.
The following morning I pulled The "intake runner control valve" cleaned it and worked it back and forth to ensure it was free. Then I cleaned out the intake and worked the intake runner "butterflies" back and forth. Everything felt free, so I put it back together. I had the negative battery terminal off, While doing all this so I put it back on and started up the Patriot. The Check engine light was out. I took it for a 10 mile test ride and the light didn't come back on. Drove to work today 86 miles and it ran good with no lights, no shuddering. Hopefully it will stay that way.
Just thought I would post here. I have 188K on my Patriot and this is the first time I have seen the check engine light. There is a ton of info and posts on this forum about this issue. The one thing to note if you experience this is that the "intake runner control valve" is spring loaded and the tab should turn about 1/4 turn and spring back. The intake runner shaft only turns about 1/8 of a turn and is not spring loaded. If you go to a dealer they don;t spend much time looking into it or trying to clean it up. They will tell you that you need a new intake manifold and quote you 1000 to 1200 dollars to replace it. They just order a new manifold with a new control valve already on it. To get easy access to the control valve, simply remove the large hose going to the air box, unbolt the air box and lay it up on the top cover of the engine. Then disconnect the radiator hose from the upper thermostat housing and lift it up. Use a bungie to hold the radiator hose and air intake hose up out of the way and the control valve is easy to access. Others have posted lots of pictures and even videos in the past. I just wanted to drop a post explaining the difference in movement in the control valve and intake runner shaft because it seems odd that the intake runner shaft only has 1/8 turn of movement and the control valve has twice that. It will make you wonder if the intake runner butterflies are not moving the way they are supposed to. Good luck and I hope if you have this issue you will get as lucky as I did and be able to fix it without spending 150 bucks on a new control valve!
Thank you for your post!
 
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