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Hope it goes well!

Another update:

Just got back from another trip into the mountains up I-70. Lots of traffic but I was able to go 65-70 MPH West from the Morrison exit for about 2 miles uphill before we started slowing down.

This section of highway is steep (6% grade) and the FDII tachs between 4.5-5k RPM to maintain that speed. The A/C was on and the outside temp read 86F. The highest the trans temp went was 192F, with absolutely no whining at all.

It's working as good as it did when new, maybe better.

Keeping fingers crossed...

Well, picked up the vehicle on Saturday and it's probably the placebo effect but the drivetrain sounded quieter in all situations. Had the complete 48mo/64k service done which included plugs, air filter, RDU/PTU plus full trans service. Did not get to do any highway driving until yesterday. 85 degrees, A/C on and 70MPH, no whining at all however it was only for about 15 miles. Going completely across the island on Thursday and temps will be in the 80's so that will be a better test.

TBC'd. Thanks for all the advice.
 

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You bet.

I bought the dipstick from Dorman, and also sent my Scangauge II in for a firmware update so I could add the X-gauge for transmission temperature. I can now check the fluid level and temperature against the chart as well as keep an eye on the temp while I drive.

When I was out today the CVT temp stayed between 150-160F.
I am about to change my fluid and filter. I am planning to pick up the same Dorman dipstick but I was wondering how it indicates the correct fill level? Is it made specifically for the Patriot's tranny?
 

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I am about to change my fluid and filter. I am planning to pick up the same Dorman dipstick but I was wondering how it indicates the correct fill level? Is it made specifically for the Patriot's tranny?
Hi Kelly, welcome!

The dipstick measures in millimeters, then you compare the dipstick reading vs. temperature on the chart that comes with it. It isn't specific to the Patriot. If you don't have a way to get the trans temp readings from the vehicle, (like a scan gauge or android torque app) you can get close by measuring the fluid level before you drain then refill to that level.

This post gives the general idea:
http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/1522449-post15.html

I drained mine with the engine cold (around 70F) and it took about 5.5 quarts.

Here's what the chart looks like. CVT is chart B:
 

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After dealing with this issue on my 2015 FDII Patriot, I traded it in for a Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. Nobody should have to deal with this faulty transmission. The last straw was last week when I had to pull over twice on the freeway while trying to navigate with a limping car across 4 lanes with a-holes that don't want to let u through... very dangerous situation.
 

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After dealing with this issue on my 2015 FDII Patriot, I traded it in for a Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. Nobody should have to deal with this faulty transmission. The last straw was last week when I had to pull over twice on the freeway while trying to navigate with a limping car across 4 lanes with a-holes that don't want to let u through... very dangerous situation.
After pulling over once with trans limping you should have stayed in the slow lane. Common Sense Situation. :smile2:
 

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It must be summer. I'm seeing all these CVT overheating problems. I think we have 3 active threads on this, though I see some of the participants are the same people posting in several threads.

Whether its a poor design or people demanding more of their vehicles than can be reasonably expected, is anybody's guess. That said, if you're driving in any more than average conditions, a tranny cooler is probably a good idea.

Driving with a fully loaded vehicle in desert heat, climbing long mountainous grades, consistently exceeding the posted limits on the expressway, or towing -- those are more than the CVT is likely to handle. Nothing defective here, just conditions out of the norm.
 

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Hmm, it must be summer. We're seeing all these threads come to life about overheating transmissions. I think we have three active presently, although some of the posters are participating in more than one thread.

I doubt this is a defective design, but people using their vehicle under extreme conditions. If you're in the south in the summer (or even here in New England), carrying a full load, climbing mountain grades, or consistently exceeding the posted limits on the expressways, is stressful on the tranny. Those are extreme conditions -- expect stress-related problem.

Or, get a tranny cooler. Not expensive, and a lot cheaper than a a new transmission . . . or a new vehicle!
 

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After dealing with this issue on my 2015 FDII Patriot, I traded it in for a Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. Nobody should have to deal with this faulty transmission. The last straw was last week when I had to pull over twice on the freeway while trying to navigate with a limping car across 4 lanes with a-holes that don't want to let u through... very dangerous situation.
Totally agree. Fortunately I've never had the vehicle fail over into limp mode. Just the whining. You made the right decision. Unfortunately for me I paid it off and I'd be lucky to get $10K for my 2012 now. So my plan is to purchase a new pan with a drain plug and change the fluid every 30K. Got to make the best of a bad situation. Who knows? Maybe someday Chrysler will make good on it. NOT!:frown2:
 

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Nothing extreme here!

Hmm, it must be summer. We're seeing all these threads come to life about overheating transmissions. I think we have three active presently, although some of the posters are participating in more than one thread.

I doubt this is a defective design, but people using their vehicle under extreme conditions. If you're in the south in the summer (or even here in New England), carrying a full load, climbing mountain grades, or consistently exceeding the posted limits on the expressways, is stressful on the tranny. Those are extreme conditions -- expect stress-related problem.

Or, get a tranny cooler. Not expensive, and a lot cheaper than a a new transmission . . . or a new vehicle!
Hello Ignatz. Did you see the picture of the old and new design for the Nissan CVT? It looks like bad design to me. Fluid gets a little worn, loses viscosity, gets beaten into a froth from the drive pulley/belt. Looks like a disaster waiting to happen with a vehicle that was obviously under engineered to begin with for cost savings.

It seems that certain owners are having more severe symptoms than others. I have never gone into limp mode fortunately. I have driven above the speed limits on occasion but normally drive at 65 to 70 MPH on the highway and a well designed vehicle should not be having these issues even in extreme temps up to over 100 degrees. Towing issues aside of course.

It will be interesting to see if the Nissan redesign has a positive impact as I've heard Nissan owners have the same issues with their CVT vehicles. If it works will Nissan work with owners of their older vehicles with the old design? We'll see.
 

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No, I am not familiar with any changes in CVT design. I am a fan of the concept and would choose another if given the opportunity. Should I need another vehicle in the near future a slightly used Patriot with a CVT would be on my short list.

It would be smart for Nissan to service Patriots, if only to build a relationship with Patriot owners. Many years ago my Wife bought a used Honda m/c that gave Her a lot of trouble. She got to know the Honda people pretty well and despite the miserable experience with that used one She bought several new ones from them over the years because of the relationship formed with a good service department.

Warning to dealers: Your service department is the key to your next sale! If you encourage them to sell unneeded parts and recommend unnecessary repairs, owners will conclude that their vehicle is a bucket of bolts and subsequently purchase other vehicles, not your brand!
This is also a reason for customers to work with small dealerships and not the ones that advertise the lowest prices (the dealer is going to make that money up somewhere).
 

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No, I am not familiar with any changes in CVT design. I am a fan of the concept and would choose another if given the opportunity. Should I need another vehicle in the near future a slightly used Patriot with a CVT would be on my short list.

It would be smart for Nissan to service Patriots, if only to build a relationship with Patriot owners. Many years ago my Wife bought a used Honda m/c that gave Her a lot of trouble. She got to know the Honda people pretty well and despite the miserable experience with that used one She bought several new ones from them over the years because of the relationship formed with a good service department.

Warning to dealers: Your service department is the key to your next sale! If you encourage them to sell unneeded parts and recommend unnecessary repairs, owners will conclude that their vehicle is a bucket of bolts and subsequently purchase other vehicles, not your brand!
This is also a reason for customers to work with small dealerships and not the ones that advertise the lowest prices (the dealer is going to make that money up somewhere).
Check out Pg 7 to see the old/new design that Nissan has.
 

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So the difference is that the fluid level is lower? At first glance that seems counter-intuitive, but if the objective is to reduce foaming, that would probably do it. Overfilling a conventional tranny will cause foaming, too.
 

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So the difference is that the fluid level is lower? At first glance that seems counter-intuitive, but if the objective is to reduce foaming, that would probably do it. Overfilling a conventional tranny will cause foaming, too.
Looking more closely at the diagram it does look like less fluid. In addition it looks like they rotated the entire trans a few degrees clockwise which moves the bottom pulley up and left to increase the distance between the pulley and the fluid.

It would be interesting to see the recommended fluid volume for the new design. If it actually is less fluid then I wonder if they will be redesigning the cooling system also.
 

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After driving long hours and towing a trailer in hot weather I have to say that my transmission doesn't overheat any more. The extra cooler and pump helps to keep the temperature in check.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
Do you have some pics you could share of what you did?
 

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i didn't take any pictures. maybe i can take some on the weekend. I drilled three holes into the side of the oil pan. Brazed fittings on each of the holes. On is for the temperature switch. One is forward line to the external pump, the other is return from the external cooler. I bought a transmission oil cooler from etrailer.com. go get a big cooler, I have two medium sized ones. Don't know if one would be sufficient. The temperature switch triger a relay that turnz the pump on. tje pump circulatez the oil tjrough the cooler and back into tje sump. placing thr fittings is a little tricky, the valve block is close to the side of the oil pan. pump as 35 bucks at ali express, switch 10 bucks. I will still add an in line filter in case the pump decides the give up. That still needs to happen.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

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i didn't take any pictures. maybe i can take some on the weekend. I drilled three holes into the side of the oil pan. Brazed fittings on each of the holes. On is for the temperature switch. One is forward line to the external pump, the other is return from the external cooler. I bought a transmission oil cooler from etrailer.com. go get a big cooler, I have two medium sized ones. Don't know if one would be sufficient. The temperature switch triger a relay that turnz the pump on. tje pump circulatez the oil tjrough the cooler and back into tje sump. placing thr fittings is a little tricky, the valve block is close to the side of the oil pan. pump as 35 bucks at ali express, switch 10 bucks. I will still add an in line filter in case the pump decides the give up. That still needs to happen.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
Www.aliexpress.com
Www.derale.com

Derale offers electric fans as well, but the Jeep will kick in it's own fan when the coolant and tranny oil get warm. There are different external pump kits available, I went cheap because I didn't want to send a single penny on my Patriot until the transmission overheating was solved. Fittings are all 1/4 NPT except for the temperature switch. I used a metric hydraulic fitting (8L uses M16x1.5 threads, any fine thread M16 Nut would do as well. )



Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 
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