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Discussion Starter #1
In your opinion from the first CVT to the current CVT(2015) Improvement?

Just needing opinions..... Cuz I have a 2015 CVT.

Thanks
 

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Fiat Cherokar
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I can compare the Cvt used in the fdii. I had a 2008 fdii and now a 2012 fdii. Biggest different is the 2012 seems to shift faster and is more responsive. It probably has to do more with programming updates over the course of those 4 years. The thing with a cvt is getting used to how it feels, as it shifts way different compared to a conventional automatic
 

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i have a cvt in my 2011 and i wish the auto 6speed was available back then.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So do you guys think the 2015 is reliable and/or stable? I'm new to jeep in my 2015 so reading the web I get a sick tummy feeling seeing the bad comments on it.

Another question, if it's not good, can I change it? do they sell a better trans I can put in?
 

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I feel the cvt is just as reliable as any other transmission on the road but i personally think its a sluggish turd. Never had any problems with it but it definitely makes the Patriot feel sluggish.But when its ready to go out or "blow up" theres no hope for it from what ive read.The CVT isnt really serviceable either but some have tried too make it so it is.As far as i know all FDII models only came with a CVT transmission,nothing else.Transmission swap kits are not available either.
 

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On a side note,there are some owners in here that rock there cvt's pretty hard and keep the pedal to the metal offroading and they dont seem to have a problems
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you Bcom, as I said my 2015 is my first jeep, and CVT is new to me, My jeep so far is awesome, I just don't understand CVT fully yet, I do know I love the LOW DRIVE and 4WD when we went to Lake Mead.... Thank you for responding.. I have a lot to learn.
 

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Fiat Cherokar
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In terms of the CVT being reliable, if you check out my youtube page I"ve beat on my compass a lot harder than I should. While I've broke other parts the CVT has always worked just fine, sometimes it whines in protest but otherwise does very well.
 

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In terms of the CVT being reliable, if you check out my youtube page I"ve beat on my compass a lot harder than I should. While I've broke other parts the CVT has always worked just fine, sometimes it whines in protest but otherwise does very well.
Thanks Tyler.. that helps alot.
 

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When it is passed around that the CVT isn't serviceable, we are just passing on incomplete info.

All what I am about to type is available on Allpar, I'm not just pulling this out of my bum...
The contract that Chrysler/Jeep signed with JATCO simply absolves Chrysler/Jeep from having to stock parts, train techs and have the hassle of doing R&R work on the CVT transmission. Regardless of your warranty position, Jeep gets a replacement unit from JATCO. You pay for it however if you are out of warranty.

Nissan which uses the identical transmission in some of its vehicle and many other JATCO CVT units throughout its line certainly can service it.

The CVT transmission in our Patriots suffers from some pretty middling programming and you do have to learn its quirks but my CVT certainly lives up to my expectations in my Patriot.

1) Acceleration; the CVT doesn't like immediate, foot to the floor take off style driving. It will bog as the computer tries to decide what in heck you are doing. Get it rolling a bit and then press down on the go pedal to about half...it will smoothly gain speed and pretty quickly if done that way. I drive urban and suburban daily, large cities at least once a month and highway (120 kph speed limits rock!) again monthly for sure. I have zero issues both keeping up, merging, whatever. Anyone who tells you they can't do that simply isn't bothering to become knowledgeable on the equipment.

2) Servicing: This isn't some voodoo filled, magical box. It is a mechanical transmission, somewhat simpler in design and construction that a regular auto transmission. It does have requirements, however these can be met in your driveway if you are capable and trust yourself. The fluid is basically liquid rubber, is expensive and personally I'd pay a competent shop to service mine given the ability to turn this sideways but here's a cut and paste from another post: Take it for what it is, an unattributed bit of Internet advice:
Transmission- Valvoline CVT Fluid from Autozone $9.50/quart
you need five quarts for a filter change, use any smooth flat dip stick from any other vehicle you have as long as its flat with no twists and will insert fully to bottom of trans pan. you need 1.75 to 2.0 inches of clean green fluid on end of dip stick for a warm full transmission, don't get concerned with being exact it really doesn't matter if you have 1.8536 inches at 138 degrees or not. brown burned fluid is BAD.

FLUID AND STRAINER SERVICE

1. Remove the bolts holding the oil pan (1) to the transaxle case.
2. Remove the oil pan from the transaxle case.
3. Remove the oil pan gasket (1) from the transaxle case.
4. Remove the bolts holding the oil strainer (1) to the valve body.
5. Remove the oil strainer.
6. Remove and discard the oil strainer o-ring.

CAUTION: Do not re-use the o-ring. Apply CVT fluid when installing the o-ring.

7. Install the new o-ring (1) onto the new oil strainer.
8. Install the new oil strainer (1) onto the control valve assembly. Install and tighten the mounting bolts to 8 N•m (70 in. lbs.).
CAUTION: Do not re-use the oil pan gasket. Remove any moisture, oil, and used gasket material from the surface where the new gasket is to be installed. When installing the oil pan gasket, align the dowel pin with the dowel pin hole in the oil pan gasket.

9. Install the oil pan gasket (1) onto the transaxle case.

CAUTION: When installing the oil pan, align the dowel pin of the transaxle case with the dowel pin hole of the oil pan.

10. Install the oil pan on the transaxle case (1). Install and tighten the mounting bolts to 8 N•m (70 in.lbs.).
NOTE: Only transmission fluid of the type labeled Mopar® CVTF+4 (Automatic Transmission Fluid) should be used in this transaxle.


Just FYI I set my fluid level at 35mm with a slightly warmed up transmission. Haven't had any problems and I did this las March after I bought my patriot.
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Long post but if you made it this far, here is a little life advice:
Stop worrying about crap you have zero control over...you own the vehicle, go enjoy it. Just stop agonizing over the transmission, your option level, the rate you got your loan, the deal you made at the lot...whatever, all that is in the past, just drive, enjoy, live today, not worrying over what happened yesterday.

I really like the CVT in my Patriot.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you for posting this.... It helps me tons.... I love my Patriot... I am just in this forum to learn about it.
 

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Thank you for posting this.... It helps me tons.... I love my Patriot... I am just in this forum to learn about it.
No problem.

Another thing:

Throttle tip in is the amount of pressure you need to give the accelerator pedal to get fuel to the engine.

Jeeps have always had a high tip in. This is to prevent the "on the gas/off the gas" bouncing thing if you are doing ruts or crossing a field or whatever.
Washboard dirt road, stuff like that.

This is simply ingrained in Jeep's DNA and even tho they build stuff that is close to cars we still have it. It simply takes more push to get going than on other vehicles.

that is what it is and it doesn't take long to get used to it.

Couple that with the CVT programming not liking instant on throttle and you can see why folks who expect to just point and go as opposed to actually driving will seem to have issues...that they love to bellyache about. lol

It comes, all you need is to be mindful that this isn't a sports car.

Don't just push and hope, modulate so that you push past the throttle tip in but not so far/fast that you befuddle the computer. Once you get rolling a bit (I'm talking about a couple of mph, not all the way across the intersection) you can use the accelerator as you see fit. Steady and sure or as quickly as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
No problem.

Another thing:

Throttle tip in is the amount of pressure you need to give the accelerator pedal to get fuel to the engine.

Jeeps have always had a high tip in. This is to prevent the "on the gas/off the gas" bouncing thing if you are doing ruts or crossing a field or whatever.
Washboard dirt road, stuff like that.

This is simply ingrained in Jeep's DNA and even tho they build stuff that is close to cars we still have it. It simply takes more push to get going than on other vehicles.

that is what it is and it doesn't take long to get used to it.

Couple that with the CVT programming not liking instant on throttle and you can see why folks who expect to just point and go as opposed to actually driving will seem to have issues...that they love to bellyache about. lol

It comes, all you need is to be mindful that this isn't a sports car.

Don't just push and hope, modulate so that you push past the throttle tip in but not so far/fast that you befuddle the computer. Once you get rolling a bit (I'm talking about a couple of mph, not all the way across the intersection) you can use the accelerator as you see fit. Steady and sure or as quickly as needed.
I'm getting used to it.... but as you say.. it's different.

I once drove a semi 48 states..... 4 years.... but this is different.
 

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Unsponsored Baja racer
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Lol, I've actually noticed less of this "tip in" with my Patriot than with my grandpa's old 2004 Duramax GMC that my parents drive these days. I think my mom's old '97 Chevy had less, but it's been a couple years since I drove it. The CVT though, has lasted me five years and nearly 70k miles with absolutely no trouble. Both the 2.4L engine and my FD1 CVT have kept running the whole time, even while the suspension and brakes wore down and got replaced. And I too have had some experience with 18-wheelers. I'd say you're pretty well off, and living the American dream. Only two recommendations I have for you are: Pay that thing off ASAP, and drive up US-95 for a camping trip to Walker Lake this summer. That's one of the prettiest places I've seen in the 46 states I've been to.
 

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Unsponsored Baja racer
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No, it's along US-95 in Nevada. Look it up on Google Maps, it's pretty big. With you being from Vegas, you only need to take US-95 north and you'll run right into it. Long ways between available stops up that way though.
 

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I love my CVT. I admit it died at 110,000 but it was completely covered by warranty. Don't let that scare you. I've had two conventional transmission die before 60,000 miles, and others that went three or four times that distance with no problems. Some will have problems, most won't. There are people on this forum with 200,000+ miles still on their original CVT.

The CVT is pretty reliable and I really like the way it performs, especially in hilly terrain as I have here in NH. When I come to a hill there is no hunting for the right gear, it just purrs a little more fervently. On a snowy hill there is no abrupt gear change as you get when a conventional automatic downshifts.

If you're looking to be first away from a stoplight, then you bought the wrong vehicle--period. If you want smooth shifting and fuel efficient, you've got it.
 
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