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CVT Fluid Change:

I just changed out my Mopar-branded transmission fluid for Valvoline CVT full synthetic Automatic Transmission Fluid (Quart bottle Part No. 804751 - 7 quarts @ Walmart $7.58/qt + tax & local pickup) for my 2007 Pat (128K miles) due to the overwhelming recommendations of forum members and local availability, including the filters (GKI TF1233 Transmission Filter & Pan Gasket @ Amazon Prime $14.12 + tax & free delivery) and (ATP B429 Cooler Filter @ RockAuto.com $9.54 + tax & ship), and replaced the pan for one with a drain plug (ULTRA-POWER 265834 {#5189837AA} Transmission Pan @ RockAuto.com $17.96 + tax & ship). Total cost for all = $112.35.

So easy, and will no longer shell out ~$350.00 per tranny fluid/filter change to a dealer or shop for less than an hour's work (plus I inspected cv boots and shaft play [no issues], checked the torque on the oil pan bolts [found a few under torque], located a potential wiring harness short against the front of the old transmission pan that may have been intermittently draining my battery [taped exposed wires and secured connector to main harness with nylon zip tie to prevent wire rub against rough edge of tranny pan], checked out/cleaned slight oil/dirt buildup on the lower half of the engine block & transmission housing [keep it clean to keep it cool], and cleaned up the top side of the plastic belly pan where the shop slopped oil during the last oil change [neatness counts!]).

I allowed the fluid to drain overnight with help of an air pump pressurizing the dipstick tube at +10psi to help push out any trapped fluids in the lines (total old fluid out = exactly 6 quarts with front of vehicle jacked up 12 inches higher than level). Verified fluid levels at high and low temps after replacing 6 quarts [7th quart not needed], cycling transmission slowly thru full range several times and taking my Pat for a check drive. Perfect.

Old Mopar fluid permanent color change when exposed to UV light:

So, when wiping out the old Mopar fluid in the old pan & magnets (less than 2 grams very fine metal powder, like photocopier toner, nothing larger - magnets cleaned and transferred to new pan with the drain plug), my rag ended up exposed to sunlight. The old Mopar fluid, a tan shade when removed, turned permanently purple after less than 2 minutes exposed to sunlight. I tried this with the new Valvoline fluid, no change in color. I tested the old Mopar fluid again, using a pH-neutral filter sheet and placed a small wrench on it to block sunlight. 3 minutes later, the old Mopar fluid turned purple only where the sunlight contacted the fluid. Figuring solar heating might be the cause, I illuminated another filter sheet impregnated with the old Mopar fluid with an ultraviolet light flashlight (UV-A) for 3 minutes, confirming photochromatic vs. thermochromic color change. As you can see by the photos of my tests, below, an impressive purple color change. Since the fluid never sees the light of day for it's intended purpose, does anyone have any academic ideas for this color change phenomenom? Is it used as a "secret" factory "tattletale" to determine if a non-approved fluid was used, in order to deny a lifetime CVT warranty claim? Is it a non-essential side effect of a chemical required for proper CVT lubrication? An indicator for wear/tear/exhaustion of the fluid? Does this occur in any other transmission fluid? Just curious, as I found no mention of this phenomena on the forum.

Wiring Harness insulation damage at transmission pan:

While performing the fluid/filter change, I noticed that wires from a large wiring harness to a connector were hanging down and rubbing on the rough, front edge of my transmission pan, cutting into the wiring insulation. I have been encountering intermittent battery drain issues if Pat is not driven for a couple days. Some times, the new battery is mysteriously too low to start the car or even as low as 1 or 2 volts....not good! Alternator verified charging battery at around 14 volts, so not the problem. No main wiring harness runs underneath the battery holder as described in some past posts (but it is how you easily access the top bolts and filter for the transmission heat exchange cooler...bottom bolts are easily accessed thru the driver-side front wheel well). I carefully repaired the insulation and secured the wiring away from the pan with a nylon zip-tie (not cheap plastic, I don't want it ever breaking) to prevent reoccurrence. See pictures below. Can anyone tell me what this bundle of wires to the connector controls or monitors? Could this be the cause of my mysterious battery drain when the Pat is not in use?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
As far as I can tell, no pics were attached or links to pics included.
Pictures definitely attached in original post, verified in preview before posting, and I can still see them (forum software issue? See if IT guy can resolve?). Reposting photos below. Please let me know whether visible or not. Thanks!
 

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There's 3 images in the latest post, the first looks like it just a graphic. But still nothing in the first post. Did you "insert" the attached pics?

I don't know of any forum issues, but you might ask the admins.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There's 3 images in the latest post, the first looks like it just a graphic. But still nothing in the first post. Did you "insert" the attached pics?

I don't know of any forum issues, but you might ask the admins.
There's 3 images in the latest post, the first looks like it just a graphic. But still nothing in the first post. Did you "insert" the attached pics?

I don't know of any forum issues, but you might ask the admins.
Haven't tried re-adding photos to initial post yet. Didn't want to possibly mess up IT guy debug by overwriting the initial post's "tracks". Glad that the three photos are at least visible now. The first photo is not a graphic. Shows the UV color change effect (to purple) of old Mopar CVT fluid when exposed to sunlight (and UV light) for 3 minutes. CVT fluid was light tan color when drained. Hoping someone will be able to ID what that wiring connector, that was rubbing, connects to, and if that might be reason for battery drain. Since zip-tying, have not experienced battery drain issue, but as drain issue was intermittent, might not be the actual source of the battery drain. Thanks!
 

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CVT Fluid Change:

I just changed out my Mopar-branded transmission fluid for Valvoline CVT full synthetic Automatic Transmission Fluid (Quart bottle Part No. 804751 - 7 quarts @ Walmart $7.58/qt + tax & local pickup) for my 2007 Pat (128K miles) due to the overwhelming recommendations of forum members and local availability, including the filters (GKI TF1233 Transmission Filter & Pan Gasket @ Amazon Prime $14.12 + tax & free delivery) and (ATP B429 Cooler Filter @ RockAuto.com $9.54 + tax & ship), and replaced the pan for one with a drain plug (ULTRA-POWER 265834 {#5189837AA} Transmission Pan @ RockAuto.com $17.96 + tax & ship). Total cost for all = $112.35.

So easy, and will no longer shell out ~$350.00 per tranny fluid/filter change to a dealer or shop for less than an hour's work (plus I inspected cv boots and shaft play [no issues], checked the torque on the oil pan bolts [found a few under torque], located a potential wiring harness short against the front of the old transmission pan that may have been intermittently draining my battery [taped exposed wires and secured connector to main harness with nylon zip tie to prevent wire rub against rough edge of tranny pan], checked out/cleaned slight oil/dirt buildup on the lower half of the engine block & transmission housing [keep it clean to keep it cool], and cleaned up the top side of the plastic belly pan where the shop slopped oil during the last oil change [neatness counts!]).

I allowed the fluid to drain overnight with help of an air pump pressurizing the dipstick tube at +10psi to help push out any trapped fluids in the lines (total old fluid out = exactly 6 quarts with front of vehicle jacked up 12 inches higher than level). Verified fluid levels at high and low temps after replacing 6 quarts [7th quart not needed], cycling transmission slowly thru full range several times and taking my Pat for a check drive. Perfect.

Old Mopar fluid permanent color change when exposed to UV light:

So, when wiping out the old Mopar fluid in the old pan & magnets (less than 2 grams very fine metal powder, like photocopier toner, nothing larger - magnets cleaned and transferred to new pan with the drain plug), my rag ended up exposed to sunlight. The old Mopar fluid, a tan shade when removed, turned permanently purple after less than 2 minutes exposed to sunlight. I tried this with the new Valvoline fluid, no change in color. I tested the old Mopar fluid again, using a pH-neutral filter sheet and placed a small wrench on it to block sunlight. 3 minutes later, the old Mopar fluid turned purple only where the sunlight contacted the fluid. Figuring solar heating might be the cause, I illuminated another filter sheet impregnated with the old Mopar fluid with an ultraviolet light flashlight (UV-A) for 3 minutes, confirming photochromatic vs. thermochromic color change. As you can see by the photos of my tests, below, an impressive purple color change. Since the fluid never sees the light of day for it's intended purpose, does anyone have any academic ideas for this color change phenomenom? Is it used as a "secret" factory "tattletale" to determine if a non-approved fluid was used, in order to deny a lifetime CVT warranty claim? Is it a non-essential side effect of a chemical required for proper CVT lubrication? An indicator for wear/tear/exhaustion of the fluid? Does this occur in any other transmission fluid? Just curious, as I found no mention of this phenomena on the forum.

Wiring Harness insulation damage at transmission pan:

While performing the fluid/filter change, I noticed that wires from a large wiring harness to a connector were hanging down and rubbing on the rough, front edge of my transmission pan, cutting into the wiring insulation. I have been encountering intermittent battery drain issues if Pat is not driven for a couple days. Some times, the new battery is mysteriously too low to start the car or even as low as 1 or 2 volts....not good! Alternator verified charging battery at around 14 volts, so not the problem. No main wiring harness runs underneath the battery holder as described in some past posts (but it is how you easily access the top bolts and filter for the transmission heat exchange cooler...bottom bolts are easily accessed thru the driver-side front wheel well). I carefully repaired the insulation and secured the wiring away from the pan with a nylon zip-tie (not cheap plastic, I don't want it ever breaking) to prevent reoccurrence. See pictures below. Can anyone tell me what this bundle of wires to the connector controls or monitors? Could this be the cause of my mysterious battery drain when the Pat is not in use?

Thanks!
Hey Steve, I heard that the transmission cooler filter can be a little tricky to replace. Mainly because of the O ring that may not stay in the groove when bolting everything back together.

Did you find this process tough?
 

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Hey Steve, I heard that the transmission cooler filter can be a little tricky to replace. Mainly because of the O ring that may not stay in the groove when bolting everything back together.

Did you find this process tough?
[/QUOI
I've replaced mine twice and found it super simple. just put a little bit of silicone based grease on the o-ring and it will stay in place while you put everything back together.
 

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okay that is helpful, you just reused the O ring I take it? Did you have to take off the wheel well liners to bolt the bottom 2 bolts?
 

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okay that is helpful, you just reused the O ring I take it? Did you have to take off the wheel well liners to bolt the bottom 2 bolts?
No, no need to take off the wheel well liner. You need to remove the battery and the battery tray, which is quite simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hey Steve, I heard that the transmission cooler filter can be a little tricky to replace. Mainly because of the O ring that may not stay in the groove when bolting everything back together.

Did you find this process tough?
I thoroughly cleaned the mating surfaces to remove all old transmission oil, etc. and carefully cleaned the o-ring (reused) to remove the old transmission oil in order to increase the adhesion of a thick-bodied 100% pure silicone grease (I'm an old Navy/scuba/commercial diver so I have a few containers of this stuff lying around) to hold to the o-ring in place. I was careful to favor the grease in the groove to the outside of the o-ring, removing any excess to the inside of the o-ring to minimize grease getting into the new transmission oil. Worked like a charm.

I accessed the top filter housing bolts via removing the battery and battery holder, and, since I had remove the plastic belly pan off to change the transmission oil, accessed the bottom filter housing bolts thru the wheel well.
 
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