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The battery died in our 2005 malibu. It was the original so it was time and it was -15 the past 3 nights. I'm having AAA come out this morning. Does anyone object to having one of their batteries installed??
 

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Personally, I think you'd have much better luck with a 12 volt car battery, but I guess you could use AAAs if you had a ton of them and wired it right... :D

Sorry, I couldn't help myself:) but seriously, depending on what type of battery they use(I'm assuming it will probably be a cheap store brand one) it may be just fine. In any case, it will work ok for awhile and give you enough time to go find another one. Or, it could be a great battery and last for years. There's really a bunch of factors in this. Battery brand, cold cranking amps etc. So you'll have to figure out if their replacement is up to par.
 

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How much is it? If that is the only option I guess you do what you have to. I do not know who makes their batteries, but I would try to get a high end battery.
 

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I had AAA install a battery in my Ford a few years ago. They give you a couple options - cheaper or better one and they offer a replacement warranty. I've had no problems with the battery they installed.
 

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Buy the largest battery that will fit into the battery box--get the extended warranty. I find that Autozone and Interstate have good products--then too, so does Costco. Of course, if you don't have wheels--battery dead--then Triple A will have to work.

Good luck!
 

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Buy the largest battery that will fit into the battery box--get the extended warranty.
Is this really a good idea? Other than price, are there any disadvantages to buying the biggest (I am assuming amps) battery that will fit?

Or is it better to buy the appropriate size battery for the vehicle based on the manual?

Nooblet minds want to know.
 

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I'm sure he meant biggest as far as cold cranking amps goes, and extra amps will never hurt.
 

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What I always do is take the old battery out, and take it to any auto-parts store and get a new one with the same amount of cranking amps or a little more. Most autoparts stores will give you a discount for turning in your old battery to them. Just do it yourself, why involve AAA. I mean if you get a flat why not change it yourself? You gonna call and wait 30 minutes for a AAA tow truck to get there?
 

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with the colder weather I suggest getting a gel cell battery. They put them in cars, boats, campers. They have move power at lower temps then standard batterys and they don't leak fluid all over if they get broken and can be mounted in a variety of positions instead of on their base (comes in handy with some aftermarket mods).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Follow Up

UPDATE!!

So I tried some 9volts I had laying around but I still couldn't get the car to turn over :p

I did go with AAA's battery replacement service.
They have their own brand. (I've seen, just like in any product, good reviews and bad reviews about them) but it has a 3 year nationwide free replacement warranty so I went for it. It has 650 cc amps (my old one had 525). It was $110. I compared their battery to others, most of the others were about $90.

They were there within 30 minutes, they took the old one and installed the new one in about 15 minutes

So now I feel the need to defend myself to one post.
Yes of course I could have done it myself, I have in the past including changing flats. Which is precisely why I pay the $4 a month for AAA. A steal of a deal IMO. It would have taken me much longer. No one was open for me to purchase my own so between waiting for a store to open, driving there and back, removing and installing the new one, not to mention it was -6 out that morning... I had my coffee in my warm house while I waited hahahaha :D
Well worth the time and $20 extra IMO.

It can be a total pain in the butt to do some things yourself especially in this weather... it's fricken cold!!!
You could chalk it up to being lazy if you want but don't get me wrong I'm a DIY'er as much as the next guy. Some things you just need to leave up to the professionals ;)

I recommend a AAA membership to most.

Thanks to everyone for their replies.
Happy Holidays
 

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Thanks for the update BlackBetty. I've had AAA for a long long time, rarely use it, but when you need it it's sure nice to have. I used to get a lot of TripTix for planning trips too, but now just use the on-line map services.

I do my own mait too, but recently purchased a service plan from Jeep for 4 oil changes for $40. Went in Tuesday of this week for an oil change, was 15 degrees out, and was glad I didn't have to do it myself out in the cold. Besides, that price is less than I can buy the oil and filters for.

I also have a AAA credit card, they give me 5% off of all gas purchases when I use their card.
 

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Glad you're back up and running.

I guess I'm a little late, but I thought I'd second nweed with the gel cells; I've found the spiral cell batteries like "Red Top" and Canadian Tire's spiral-cell "Eliminator" more reliable than conventionals and worth the extra cost.
 

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Is this really a good idea? Other than price, are there any disadvantages to buying the biggest (I am assuming amps) battery that will fit?

Or is it better to buy the appropriate size battery for the vehicle based on the manual?

Nooblet minds want to know.
Generally, the larger size the battery, the more amp-hours it'll have--meaning additional power reserve. Having driven diesel Mercedes for years, after the 2nd, maybe 3rd year,a the battery would need replacement. Interstate batteries always had a larger capacity battery that would squeeze into the compartment.

Even the Stearman (shown below) had a spot that was ample for the 35 amp-hr aviation battery, but I found that two, 25 amp-hr batteries wired in parallel would fit giving me a 40% increase in cranking power--as when radial engines refuse to start, you need to clear the flooded condition before re-priming to start. Sure you can do that "armstrong style" (hand-propping...) and it does make quite a scene at local airports and airshows, but is increasing dangerous. As we get older we "try" to be smarter!
 
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