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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased from an individual a 2010 Jeep Patriot Limited with the 2.4 engine and 4-WD showing 163000+/- miles. I heard a "clacking" sound from the left rear when I test drove it and thought CV joint/axle, no problem as I have change many of them. There was also a "bumping" sound from about mid-way of the vehicle. The A/C was blowing cool, but not cold, air so I took it to a reputable local shop for them to check it out. They added freon and a dye so we'll see if it stays cold. The worst part: This shop also does CV axles so I asked them to check both the rear axles so see if the Jeep needed one or both. When I went to pick up the Jeep they showed me that I had major problems with what they called the "rear sub-frame" that the rear trans-axle and suspension bolt onto. The sub-frame has a serious rust problem. The mechanic told me, and showed me, the rust and told me that I would be lucky to make it the 3 miles home without the rear end falling out. He also showed me that there is a "bushing" on the drive shaft that is almost gone, this is where the bumping noise is coming from he said. They don't want to do this work as he stated that is would tie up a bay for a week or so between the work and waiting on parts. They are very busy. My question--has anyone had this problem and found a replacement rear sub-frame or the complete sub-frame and rear drive assembly to replace this one? The mechanic also told me that he would recommend using a body shop to do this work as they may be familiar with these sub-frames repairing wrecked units. Any suggestions? Thanks, David
 

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This definitely isn't unheard of, especially in the rust belt states. Subframes are pretty easy to find and can actually be found fairly cheap. Its really the labor that costs.
 

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^^ What he said. And if the rear is bad, I'd take a good look at the front, too.
The subframes are relatively cheap, but the labor can be killer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'm finding out that this is going to involve a decision to either pay dearly IF I can find a shop that will work on it or scrap the Jeep and lose my money. I went through three (3) auto repair shops today and neither of them wanted the work as it would tie up a bay for too long. I went through seven (7) auto body shops today and six (6) said no but one of them wants to look at it. IF he decides to take the work he wants to have the sub-frame in his shop before he starts the work and says that it should not take over two (2) days. He's even willing to let me leave it at his shop IF he decides to do the work until the sub-frame comes in. He looked in his computer and found one in Pensacola, Fl. and can be here in two (2) days with free shipping. I'm not too sure I want to drive the Jeep the seven (7) miles to his shop or rent a U-Haul auto trailer to take it there. Decisions, decisions. :rolleyes:
 

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It can be done:
or

The videos are for a Dodge, but the Patriot & Compass are built on the same platform so it must be a similar process.

Keep your receipts! My guess is that someone with the resources may try a class action to get a remedy.
 

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PS, I've been bragging that my 2008 Patriot is fine but in conversation with the guy I sold it to, he gave it to his son in NY and it now won't pass inspection because of the rust. It's survived thirteen winters all in New England. I don't know what he's going to do. All I can say for sure is that the tranny only has 25,000 miles on it. That would be a treasure to find in a junkyard!
 

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My suggestion:
Get AAA . It is like $95 a year, they will tow you 4 times a year. Covers any vehicle you own or any you are riding in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well this is turning into quite a project for an old car guy (me). I got the Jeep into my shop, jacked up and on jack stands, and got under it. What a mess. The left side of the rear sub-frame has completely rusted into. There is major rust everywhere among the sub-frame. One very interesting note is that the left CV axle is broken. Where the axle comes out of the rear transmission the shaft broke where it should be connected to the CV joint closest to the tranny. Someone used two large zip ties to strap the axle to part of the sub-frame to keep it from dangling. This is the shaft that goes to the left rear wheel assembly and surely had to be rotating when I drove the Jeep. That may have been the "clunking" noise I heard. NO shop in town wants anything to do with replacing the sub-frame so it looks like the next week or two I will be busy with this project. My main concern at this point is whether the bolts that hold the sub-frame to the uni-body of the Jeep are rusted tight or maybe whatever these bolts screw into are rusted bad. Only one way to find out. Question: Laying under the Jeep and looking at everything I'm wondering IF I could remove all the drive train from the drive shaft back to the rear tranny and CV axles just making this a 2-wd drive Jeep. The main problem I see would be that when I pull the driveshaft from the front transmission that would leave a hole where the driveshaft yoke would to in. Does anyone know IF there might be a "plug" that would replace the seal in the transmission tail shaft to keep the tranny fluid from leaking out? Thanks
 

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It DOES become quite a lengthy and expensive project. My 2013 Patriot (2WD) needed all the front and rear suspension components replaced due to severe rust just a month ago; she used to live in New York. The car has only 46,000 miles and the body, CVT, engine, exhaust, accessories, glass, tires are all in excellent condition. Where I live you can't do anything like that at your home and I was too lazy to check around some of the smaller mechanic garages to see if they would do the work. So I bit the bullet hard and hired the job out to my Jeep dealer where I bought it a couple of years ago. Took them about two weeks and my about $7,100 but now I have a nearly new vehicle.

Good luck with your 2010; hope it works out for you. Keep us all posted on your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
^^ What he said. And if the rear is bad, I'd take a good look at the front, too.
The subframes are relatively cheap, but the labor can be killer.
Maybe good news: The front subframe is clear of rust. It actually looks as if it has been replaced, it seems to be black powder coated and the bolts appear to be rust free. While under the Patriot looking at everything I noticed that the driveshaft is too clean, it's not even dirty, has a nice shiny black coating on it and a part # sticker that does not appear to be very old. I tried to scrape the driveshaft wondering if someone had painted it but nothing scrapped off. I think I'm good to go as far as the front end and driveshaft goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I spent about an hour and a half today just getting the 18mm nuts off of various bolts for the trailing arm, the lower shock bolt, and the frame that holds the brake assembly on of the passenger side. This is the side that has the broken CV axle. It's hard to believe that someone had used zip ties to strap the axle up to part of the sub-frame as it turns when the left rear wheel turns. How it did not burn through the zip ties I don't know. I had sprayed these bolts with penetrating oil two days ago. Today I used a toothbrush sized wire brush to clean the visible threads and sprayed them with a bit of oil. It took some time as I was taught to work a rusted bolt/nut back and forth to prevent breaking the bolt and it worked. Company coming this afternoon so I will get back on this project tomorrow. As soon as I figure out how to post photos on this forum I will start posting photos of the mess and my progress. I now know one thing for sure--this 72 year old body can't get under and around this Patriot like I used to be able to do some years ago but it is fun working on a vehicle again. OH one more question--how do I go about putting the transmission in neutral and turning the ignition key back to OFF? With the tranny in neutral and the key turned back toward OFF, but not OFF, even with the door closed there is bell dinging constantly. Maybe take the negative cable off of the battery? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'm finding out that this is going to involve a decision to either pay dearly IF I can find a shop that will work on it or scrap the Jeep and lose my money. I went through three (3) auto repair shops today and neither of them wanted the work as it would tie up a bay for too long. I went through seven (7) auto body shops today and six (6) said no but one of them wants to look at it. IF he decides to take the work he wants to have the sub-frame in his shop before he starts the work and says that it should not take over two (2) days. He's even willing to let me leave it at his shop IF he decides to do the work until the sub-frame comes in. He looked in his computer and found one in Pensacola, Fl. and can be here in two (2) days with free shipping. I'm not too sure I want to drive the Jeep the seven (7) miles to his shop or rent a U-Haul auto trailer to take it there. Decisions, decisions. :rolleyes:
After I go the Patriot in my shop, jacked up and on jack stands I found that I cannot drive this unit anywhere. Not only is the rear sub-frame broken into two pieces but the right rear CV axle is broken at the joint nearest the rear transmission/transaxle. Someone had used two medium sized zip ties to hold the broken shaft to a part of the good (?) subframe. I would not dare try to drive this Patriot anywhere now. So---I get to do what I used to enjoy, work on an older car :)
 

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Kudos for retaining a positive attitude. I just completed a refrigerator repair that took longer to diagnose than the actual fix and I felt good about "hanging in there".

A crumbling Patriot? ....... Whew, you must have lots of experience fixing old beaters to not be upset (a genuine compliment). You DID make me feel better about the cost of getting my Patriot Krown rust proofed every year. Thanks!!
 

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I recently purchased from an individual a 2010 Jeep Patriot Limited with the 2.4 engine and 4-WD showing 163000+/- miles. I heard a "clacking" sound from the left rear when I test drove it and thought CV joint/axle, no problem as I have change many of them. There was also a "bumping" sound from about mid-way of the vehicle. The A/C was blowing cool, but not cold, air so I took it to a reputable local shop for them to check it out. They added freon and a dye so we'll see if it stays cold. The worst part: This shop also does CV axles so I asked them to check both the rear axles so see if the Jeep needed one or both. When I went to pick up the Jeep they showed me that I had major problems with what they called the "rear sub-frame" that the rear trans-axle and suspension bolt onto. The sub-frame has a serious rust problem. The mechanic told me, and showed me, the rust and told me that I would be lucky to make it the 3 miles home without the rear end falling out. He also showed me that there is a "bushing" on the drive shaft that is almost gone, this is where the bumping noise is coming from he said. They don't want to do this work as he stated that is would tie up a bay for a week or so between the work and waiting on parts. They are very busy. My question--has anyone had this problem and found a replacement rear sub-frame or the complete sub-frame and rear drive assembly to replace this one? The mechanic also told me that he would recommend using a body shop to do this work as they may be familiar with these sub-frames repairing wrecked units. Any suggestions? Thanks, David
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Treegrower: Not to get into the long story but here's how I got started working on cars. At 15 years old I had to opportunity to purchase a 1955 Chevy Bel-Air 4-dr with no engine, no transmission nor a radiator. The original engine and tranny were a six cylinder and a 3-speed tranny. Back then, around 1964, there were a number of local "junk yards" one could go and get auto parts and you had to take them off. When the owner of the junk yard heard my plight he made me an offer. I work for him for three (3) Saturdays and he would give me a 6 cylinder motor and 3-speed tranny to put in my car. So I did that and had me a motor and tranny, condition unknown. A friend of mine's Dad went with me to pick up the units with his old bear up pick up truck and we got them home. Another good friend of mine offered to help put the motor and tranny in my car to get it running but I still needed a radiator. I went to a local radiator shop to ask about a used one and the owner made me somewhat of the same deal. I work for him in the afternoon's after school for a week and he would give me a re-conditioned radiator for my '55 Chevy. So, my friend and I did all the work, got the car together and I drove it for at least two years. It had literally no power, smoked bad, but was transportation to a 16 year old at the time I finished the project. I've had older cars off and on since them and enjoy turning wrenches on them. This Jeep may turn out to be the worst project I have ever taken on due to the rust on all the underside of the rear end. I'm having a lot of problems getting nuts off of bolts because I am concerned with breaking the bolts and not bring able to readily find them. There are two (2) arms of the rear end that I was told are "camber adjustment" bolts and I have been told that they are not camber adjustment bolts, who knows. These do have an eccentric washer on them so I am suspecting that these are adjustment bolts for aligning the rear wheels. I use an old trick I learned years ago for rusted bolts/nuts--A mixture of transmission fluid and diesel fuel. This was before we had such things as " PB Blaster" and such. I also use a small, toothbrush sized,, wire brush to clean the exposed threads off as much as possible. I back the nuts off maybe one round then turn it back towards tightening it then clean some more. The next time I may go two (2) rounds and do the same. Back and forth and gain a little each time. I've gotten most of the bolts/nuts associated with the right side rear end off except for the camber adjustment bolt/ nut. I'll get there eventually. My plans are to pass this Jeep on to my g'son next year for his ride and it certainly will be in great shape. :)
 

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Since you just got this, maybe you don't know but the trannies in these Patriots are a known weak point. The fluid and filters (2) should be changed at least every 50.000 miles. I hope yours was changed before this, but as long as you're doing so much work . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Since you just got this, maybe you don't know but the trannies in these Patriots are a known weak point. The fluid and filters (2) should be changed at least every 50.000 miles. I hope yours was changed before this, but as long as you're doing so much work . . .
I didn't know that about the tranny. For my information--This Patriot is 4 wd and has a tranny in the back also. Does this apply to both the tranny's? Thanks for the info. One more thing to learn about this Jeep, I'll You Tube it.
 

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I didn't know that about the tranny. For my information--This Patriot is 4 wd and has a tranny in the back also. Does this apply to both the tranny's? Thanks for the info. One more thing to learn about this Jeep, I'll You Tube it.
Hi Thurman,

The rear drive unit (RDU) is two parts, the differential and the electric clutch. The electric clutch isn't serviceable, but the differential requires a fluid change around 80k miles.
There is also a power take off unit (PTU) up by the transmission that needs service at 80k miles.

Here's a good write-up on it:
 

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The CVT is the transmission "in front" as you say. It's snuggled right next to the engine. Both my Patriots are FWD so I have no idea about the PTU and RDU.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well, I finally got the rusted rear sub-frame on the garage floor. It came out in three (3) pieces and with the rear drive unit attached as one of the RDU mounting bolts would not let loose working under the Pat. After researching a new replacement sub-frame I bought one off of eBay. The sub-frame comes with new mounting bolts and bushings. The seller requires that I send them the VIN so that they can make sure they send me the correct part. Now, let's see IF I can post a pic. In the pic notice that the left front mounting hole is missing. That part broke off and is lying under the Pat. Yes that's plumbers strapping holding parts of the sub-frame together on the left side. Now comes the fun part, putting everything off of this sub-frame on to the new one.
94272
 
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