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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Girlfriend has a 2008 Jeep Patriot that she bought a few years ago with 64K miles on it. She now has 110k on it and will have it up to 120K on it by the end of the semester. She's starting Law school in the fall, so I'd like to get her car ready for another 100K. She says she needs it to last her through law school and a year after that.

I don't think her car had its 60K service, and I know it hasn't had its 102K service, and a few more things come up at 120K.

Here's everything that is due according to the manual at 102k and 120K:

Coolant
Serpentine Belt
Replace the timing belt
Spark Plugs
Engine Air Filter
PCV valve
Transmission Fluid
Transmission Filter
Rear Drive Assembly Oil
Power Transfer Unit Oil
Engine oil and filter (of course)

Other things I'm considering:

New Power Steering fluid
All new brake fluid.
New Thermostat

I'm going to need some expert advice, because I've never had a CVT apart, and apparently Jeep patriots don't have a transmission dipstick. So I've got a few questions for everyone:

What should I look out for when servicing the CVT? Is it worth it to replace the timing belt? If so how? Does anyone know where I can get a service manual? The fill cap was a little sludgy when I last changed the oil in this car (picture attached), should I try some seafoam or another cleaner in the crankcase (I'm open to suggestions)? Any other things to look out for when working on this car?
 

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Welcome to the forum!

You seem a bit more ambitious than the average vehicle owner. About half the things on your list are simple and if you poke around the site you'll find how-to threads on lots of things. I don't get into fluids other than engine oil and coolant. I've never done brake fluid, p/s fluid or tranny and differential fluids myself.

Warning: Changing the air filter is more challenging than you'd think. An amateur like me can do it, but it is an aggravating task.

I'm told the Patriot has two thermostats -- haven't messed with mine yet, but I've done thermostats on lots of other vehicles. Normally simple.

As for the CVT, if you know what you're doing, I guess you could. If I were you I'd think long & hard before I got into that. God forbid you screw it up, there isn't much you can do to fix a CVT and it will cost a pretty penny to replace it. I just had my dealer do it. My tranny had a leak so the repair and fluid were covered under warranty; all I paid for was the new filter which they did at my request while they were in there. My original CVT failed at 110,000 (also covered under warranty) so I'd definitely recommend early service, even if the manual doesn't.

Oh, you didn't mention hoses. Don't forget to take a look at those.
 

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And on the other hand, if you're accustomed to doing maintenance type work on cars, the air filter is a cinch (I changed mine in less that 5 minutes). The cvt fluid change will require dropping the pan but there's no reason to be afraid to do it for fear of "screwing it up". Do a little research (search on this site, plenty of threads on changing CVT fluid) and measure the amount of fluid removed and put that much new fluid back in. You can use Valvoline cvt fluid, or as in my case I used Kendall cvt fluid because I got a case of 12 for $5 a quart. The dealer fluid they try to intimidate everyone to use is around $20 a quart.
You can do the change for about $50-75, the dealer will charge you in the neighborhood of $300.
You can also buy a dipstick, or use any dipstick that will fit into the filler tube that is long enough to reach the bottom of the pan.

As for the brake and power steering fluids, I've never changed those on any car I've ever owned (and I'm 62 ). I'm not saying don't bother, but I never has a problem with those either.

Patriots have a timing chain, so there is no timing belt to change.

http://www.jeeppatriot.com/forum/5-jeep-patriot-general-discussion/312833-kendall-cvt-fluid.html

FLUID AND STRAINER SERVICE

1. Remove the bolts holding the oil pan (1) to the transaxle case.
2. Remove the oil pan from the transaxle case.
3. Remove the oil pan gasket (1) from the transaxle case.
4. Remove the bolts holding the oil strainer (1) to the valve body.
5. Remove the oil strainer.
6. Remove and discard the oil strainer o-ring.

CAUTION: Do not re-use the o-ring. Apply CVT fluid when installing the o-ring.

7. Install the new o-ring (1) onto the new oil strainer.
8. Install the new oil strainer (1) onto the control valve assembly. Install and tighten the mounting bolts to 8 N•m (70 in. lbs.).

CAUTION: Do not re-use the oil pan gasket. Remove any moisture, oil, and used gasket material from the surface where the new gasket is to be installed. When installing the oil pan gasket, align the dowel pin with the dowel pin hole in the oil pan gasket.

9. Install the oil pan gasket (1) onto the transaxle case.

CAUTION: When installing the oil pan, align the dowel pin of the transaxle case with the dowel pin hole of the oil pan.

10. Install the oil pan on the transaxle case (1). Install and tighten the mounting bolts to 8 N•m (70 in.lbs.).
NOTE: Only transmission fluid of the type labeled Mopar® CVTF+4 (Automatic Transmission Fluid) should be used in this transaxle.

11. Check the oil level (Refer to 21 - TRANSMISSION/TRANSAXLE/AUTOMATIC - CVT/FLUID - STANDARD PROCEDURE)
TRANSMISSION FILL
To avoid overfilling transmission after a fluid change or overhaul, perform the following procedure:

1. Verify that the vehicle is parked on a level surface.
2. Remove the dipstick tube cap.
3. Add following initial quantity of MOPAR® CVTF+4, Automatic Transmission Fluid, to the transmission:
a. If only fluid and filter were changed, add 7.0 L (14.8 pts.) of transmission fluid to transmission.
b. If the transmission was completely overhauled or the torque converter was replaced or drained, add 8.1 L (17.1 pts.) of transmission fluid to transmission.
4. Check the transmission fluid (Refer to 21 - TRANSMISSION/TRANSAXLE/AUTOMATIC - CVT/FLUID - STANDARD PROCEDURE) and adjust as required.
CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID LEVEL

1. Verify that the vehicle is parked on a level surface.
2. Remove the dipstick tube cap.
WARNING: There is a risk of accident from vehicle starting off by itself when engine is running. There is a risk of injury from contusions and burns if you insert your hands into the engine when it is started or when it is running. Secure vehicle to prevent it from moving off by itself. Wear properly fastened and close-fitting work clothes. Do not touch hot or rotating parts.
3. Actuate the service brake. Start engine and let it run at idle speed in selector lever position "P".
4. Shift through the transmission modes several times with the vehicle stationary and the engine idling.
5. Warm up the transmission, wait at least 2 minutes and check the oil level with the engine running. Push the Oil Dipstick 9336 into transmission fill tube until the dipstick tip contacts the oil pan and pull out again, read off oil level, repeat if necessary.
NOTE: The dipstick will protrude from the fill tube when installed.
 

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I've changed the CVT fluid and filter on my 2008 twice. The last time, I put a pan back on that has a drain plug so I can just do a drain and refill yearly (20K for me).
Cost for the pan with drain plug is around $45.00

Its pretty simple. Important thing is to use the correct fluid and put the correct amount in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does anyone have opinions on using Synthetic gear oil in the differentials? I see the owners manual says to use conventional only, I can't think of a good reason why that is...
 

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Uh, Griff, you may be more handy with a screwdriver than I am, but changing the air filter on a Patriot is miserable. Yes, it takes about 5 minutes which is 4-1/2 minutes more than anything else I've owned. :mad:

Agreed on the brake & p/s fluids -- to clarify, I've never done those fluids, nor had them done by anyone else. I've been contradicted on this, but I see no practical reason for it. And as I said, I've never touched a transmission, manual, auto or CVT. You gave a nice how-to on that.
 

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I agree, it should be much easier than it is....but 5 min is still not that bad.

People shouldn't be afraid to do maintenance on their cars....if they're at all interested in doing it. I have Microsoft Word Document with all kinds of information about my Patriot on it such as how to change the cvt fluid and several keyfob programming instructions (such as how to reprogram a key, or how to change how your doorlocks work, etc). Also all the bulb numbers, how to disable the horn on lock, disable seat belt chimes, reset ECU driving habit, reset oil change indicator.........
I also use this Word Document to keep records of maintenance I've done, the date, mileage, etc and any other repairs I've made.

This is where I got the write up on changing the cvt fluid...just copied and pasted it out of my document.
 

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I'm ok with working on vehicles, but certainly not professional. I sure miss the good ol' days, when vehicles were much simpler and easier to work on.
 

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I'm ok with working on vehicles, but certainly not professional. I sure miss the good ol' days, when vehicles were much simpler and easier to work on.
Amen, brother! I miss those days too.
On the other hand my Patriot has the same size engine as my 1960 Falcon, gets identical gas mileage, and has about twice the power.
Isn't technology wonderful?
 

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I agree, it should be much easier than it is....but 5 min is still not that bad.

People shouldn't be afraid to do maintenance on their cars....if they're at all interested in doing it. I have Microsoft Word Document with all kinds of information about my Patriot on it such as how to change the cvt fluid and several keyfob programming instructions (such as how to reprogram a key, or how to change how your doorlocks work, etc). Also all the bulb numbers, how to disable the horn on lock, disable seat belt chimes, reset ECU driving habit, reset oil change indicator.........
I also use this Word Document to keep records of maintenance I've done, the date, mileage, etc and any other repairs I've made.

This is where I got the write up on changing the cvt fluid...just copied and pasted it out of my document.
Hi Griff,
Just bought an 09 Patriot with about 96k on it. I'd love to get ahold of that Word Doc you have if possible. I'm no mechanic but my son and I are game to give it the old college effort from time to time. And we are brand new to Jeeps, so any assistance would be awesome! Cheers!
 

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Hi Griff,
Just bought an 09 Patriot with about 96k on it. I'd love to get ahold of that Word Doc you have if possible. I'm no mechanic but my son and I are game to give it the old college effort from time to time. And we are brand new to Jeeps, so any assistance would be awesome! Cheers!
Welcome EAnderson! FYI @griff hasn't been on the site in a couple years so you may not get a reply from him. I'm not sure what document he was talking about. However, since you're new you may not see our cleverly camouflaged search box above -- it's dark gray on the black stripe so it's nearly invisible and easily overlooked. The "Search Community" label should just say "Search Site." Enter what your looking for and you'll probably get buried in hits. Or I suppose you could just start a thread in the appropriate forum and title it for what you're seeking. We've got a pretty helpful bunch on here. Again, welcome, and good luck!
 
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