Myth 104: Ethanol is the solution - Jeep Patriot Forums
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  #1  
Old 08-07-2008, 12:47 AM
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Myth 104: Ethanol is the solution

If ethanol is the answer, it must be a dumb question.

Ethanol cannot reduce global warming, or provide a renewable source of energy. If you have some facts to convince me otherwise please post here.

Last edited by timeburgler; 08-07-2008 at 01:01 AM.
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  #2  
Old 08-07-2008, 01:06 AM
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Not me! I'm in your camp! If it weren't for the government subsidies, it wouldn't make sense to even produce it. But, those champions of global warming (gee, anyone heard of Greenland..) will use any snake oil to further their cause. My son-in-law has a compnay car that is a E85 car. When he can find ethanol, and uses it, the car doesn't perform as well, mileage goes to hell, and it is harder starting. He'd rather not use it.

Sort of like the CFLs, which are ALL made in China and the broken ones are e-waste--don't put them out in the regular trash. Do they save energy--yes. Are they cost effective? The jury's still out as we don't know how long they'll really last. I've some that are pushing 4 years--those came with a rebate/subsidy, but others crapped out in a couple of months, and one didn't work out of the box. Think of the energy required for special handling of the e-waste and we'll talk!
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  #3  
Old 08-07-2008, 02:15 AM
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How is it not renewable? its made from Corn, and its not food grade corn so its not eating into the supply of food. In fact, the process of making E85 is nearly identical to the process used to make the syrup used to make that Dr pepper or Pepsi in your hand... The bi products of the refinement of the grains can be used as food for livestock.

Ethanol is new, its still in the very early stages of development. How efficient were gasoline engines just 20 years ago? they sucked. If people had said in the early days of gasoline what people these days are saying about E85, would gasoline ever of taken off? Doubtful

Maybe ethanol is no cleaner burning than gas (although I'm tempted to get an e-test on my Grand Prix with regular gasoline and another with ethanol), but, how clean was gas in the early stages? Cars just 15 years old are polluting so much that they are being taken off the road... The production of ethanol and the consumption of ethanol is a cycle. The grain, corn for example, is ground down and separated into its individual components. Then the starches are distilled to create your E85. When you burn the e85 in your car or truck, one of the bi products coming out your tail pipe is CO2, which in turn helps to sustain the future crops of corn.

How about we look at the alternatives... we could all go hybrid... buy cars with $5000 batteries that need to be replaced on a regular basis. Did you know the construction of the batteries for the Toyota Prius make the Prius one of the most un-environmentally friendly vehicles on the road? Yup. The Nickel is mined in Sudbury Ontario, just that alone has a huge environmental impact, on top of that, the nickel is shipped via tanker ship to Europe, where it is refined and put on another ship, goes to Asia, gets turned into a battery, and back on another ship and sent to North America to be put into cars.

How about hydrogen? yeah, sounds great, thousands of mini hydrogen bombs driving down the streets of cities world wide. WAY too early in development to be a viable option right now.

Right now your not saving much money by switching to ethanol, however the more factories that open up, the less it will cost. The new plant in Southern Ontario will be starting production in the coming months...

Jamie
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:24 AM
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Corn, Ethanol is by far the worst method of solving fuel shortages. Cane, or switchgrass ethanol are better solutions.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:43 AM
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Miscanthus can meet U.S. biofuels goal using less land than corn or switchgrass


In field trials in Illinois, researchers grew Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass in adjoining plots. Miscanthus proved to be at least twice as productive as switchgrass.


Quote:
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — In the largest field trial of its kind in the United States, researchers have determined that the giant perennial grass Miscanthus x giganteus outperforms current biofuels sources – by a lot. Using Miscanthus as a feedstock for ethanol production in the U.S. could significantly reduce the acreage dedicated to biofuels while meeting government biofuels production goals, the researchers report.
...
Using corn or switchgrass to produce enough ethanol to offset 20 percent of gasoline use – a current White House goal – would take 25 percent of current U.S. cropland out of food production, the researchers report. Getting the same amount of ethanol from Miscanthus would require only 9.3 percent of current agricultural acreage. (View a narrated slideshow about Miscanthus research.)

“What we’ve found with Miscanthus is that the amount of biomass generated each year would allow us to produce about 2 1/2 times the amount of ethanol we can produce per acre of corn,” said crop sciences professor Stephen P. Long, who led the study.
...
“One reason why Miscanthus yields more biomass than corn is that it produces green leaves about six weeks earlier in the growing season,” Long said. Miscanthus also stays green until late October in Illinois, while corn leaves wither at the end of August, he said.

The growing season for switchgrass is comparable to that of Miscanthus, but it is not nearly as efficient at converting sunlight to biomass as Miscanthus, Frank Dohleman, a graduate student and co-author on the study, found.

Using the grass Miscanthus x giganteus as a feedstock for ethanol production would significantly reduce the amount of farmland needed for biofuels, said U. of I. crop sciences professor Stephen P. Long.


Corn, switchgrass and Miscanthus are grown side by side in experimental plots in Urbana, Ill. These fields, shown in 2006, were in their second year of growth.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:44 AM
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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in 1995 US corn production stood at 7.2 billion bushels, or 192 million metric tonnes. An estimated 14.7 million tonnes were used to make ethanol, based on the Department of Energy ethanol production figures for 1995, and allowing for a conversion rate of 2.8 gallons per bushel. 4.9 million tons of dried distillers grains, based on a 33 percent conversion rate, would have been returned from ethanol producers to the grain markets. This left 182 million tonnes available for US consumption and export.

In 2007, US corn production rose to 13.1 billion bushels, or 349 million tonnes. An estimated 62 million tonnes were used to produce ethanol, based on DOE ethanol production figures and a conversion rate of 2.8 gallons per bushel. 21 million tons of dried distillers grains, based on a 33 percent conversion rate, would have been returned from ethanol producers to the grain markets. This left 308 million tonnes available for US consumption and export.

The total production of corn available for domestic, non-ethanol consumption and/or export, increased 126 million metric tonnes from 1995 to 2007. Ethanol consumption increased during this period by 31 million metric tonnes. Overall production increased by 82 percent, and overall non-ethanol production available for domestic consumption and export rose by 69 percent.

With US production increasing by 157 million tonnes, after 31 million net metric tonnes are subtracted for the change in ethanol consumption, and 25 million tonnes are subtracted for a 14 percent increase for other domestic uses and export (to keep pace with population change), the US produced 101 million metric tonnes more corn in 2007 than required for its 1995 pattern of domestic production, export, and for ethanol.

...

Eliminating all other factors, including the potential for increases in domestic production in the US and China and changes in corn demand from other sources, US grain reserves would be depleted by rising Chinese demand as soon as fall 2013, even if the entire US corn ethanol industry were eliminated overnight and all corn was made available for export to China to meet rising demand for livestock feed.
...
Comparing the rise in corn, oil, wheat and rice prices since 2000, using the World Resource Institute and DOE price tables, it can clearly be seen that corn prices, while escalating rapidly, are rising slower than any of the three other food and fuel commodities. In fact, the intensity of price increases is in inverse proportion to the conversion rate into ethanol. Corn, which is used the most among the four commodities as a biofuel, has the lowest price increase. Rice and crude oil, which are not used to make ethanol, have experienced the fastest price increases.
source

There is absolutely no way you can blame ethanol for the price of corn. Please remember these facts the next time you want to repeat the "conventional wisdom" of the mainstream media.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:45 AM
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The article contains a mistake. There are 42 gallons in a barrel of ethanol. The last paragraph quoted below should read 9.4 billion gallons, not barrels. The rest of the references to barrels is correct.

On a related note, another 4.3 billion gallons worth of capacity are under construction, so this story will repeat itself next year.

U.S. ethanol production rises 10 pct in May - EIA

Quote:
NEW YORK, July 29 (Reuters) - U.S. ethanol production in May jumped 10 percent from April as the growing fleet of distilleries boosted output, a government report said.

U.S. ethanol output rose 1,675,000 barrels to 18,543,000 barrels in May, the latest month for which data was available, the Energy Information Administration said on Monday.
...
U.S. ethanol capacity has risen about 46 percent since July 2007 to more than 9.4 billion barrels per year as the government gave the industry generous incentives in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:46 AM
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New Biomass Technology Dramatically Increases Ethanol Yield From Grasses And Yard Waste

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ScienceDaily (July 29, 2008) — University of Georgia researchers have developed a new technology that promises to dramatically increase the yield of ethanol from readily available non-food crops, such as Bermudagrass, switchgrass, Napiergrass—and even yard waste.

The new technology features a fast, mild, acid-free pretreatment process that increases by at least 10 times the amount of simple sugars released from inexpensive biomass for conversion to ethanol. The technology effectively eliminates the use of expensive and environmentally unsafe chemicals currently used to pretreat biomass.

The technology is available for licensing from the University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., which has filed a patent application.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:46 AM
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Big business concocts link of biofuels, food costs

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While the Grocery Manufacturers point the finger at biofuels for food prices, Kraft Foods, which is on the Grocery Manufacturers' board of directors, boasts in a press release that company profits grew 9 percent in part because of its own "recent price increases." Kellogg's and General Mills are catching on quickly, crying publicly for the consumer while reaching deeper into their pockets in the grocery aisle.
...
When the Texas governor petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to suspend federal biofuels policy, he referenced a biofuels study by Texas A&M. Except he forgot to mention the study's primary findings: The underlying force driving change in the agricultural industry is the price of oil, and that corn prices have "little to do" with food costs.

A simple analysis of farm costs tells the story. Of the major U.S. farm inputs, the prices of fuel and fertilizer have increased by the largest margin. Fuel costs are up by 100 percent in the past 12 months, as oil companies gorge on record profits. But fertilizer, also made from oil, is up 45 percent, the largest price increase of any farm input over the past 10 years.
...
And this is where the Grocery Manufacturers' consumer concern becomes truly insincere. While using less biofuel might save the average family $15 per year for groceries from slightly lower corn prices – assuming Kraft passes along the savings – using less biofuel will increase gas prices by 15 percent to 25 percent, according to Merrill Lynch. That's about $500 per year at the pump per person.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:47 AM
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DuPont Danisco and University of Tennessee Partner to Build Innovative Cellulosic Ethanol Pilot Facility

Quote:
NASHVILLE, Tenn., July 23, 2008 – DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol LLC (DDCE) and the University of Tennessee (UT) Research Foundation, through its Genera Energy LLC, today announced a partnership to construct an innovative pilot-scale biorefinery and state-of-the-art research and development facility for cellulosic ethanol in Vonore, Tenn.

The pilot-scale biorefinery will develop the commercial package for DDCE’s leading cellulosic ethanol technology. The project will utilize UT’s world-class expertise in cellulosic feedstock production and co-product research, as well as its work with Tennessee farmers to develop the first dedicated cellulosic energy crop supply chain for cellulosic biorefineries utilizing switchgrass. The facility design will incorporate the flexibility to operate on two different non-food biomass feedstocks – corn stover, cobs and fiber; and switchgrass.
...
The pilot plant and process development unit (PDU) will be located at the Niles Ferry Industrial Park. A PDU is a research facility that enables both experimentation at larger than laboratory scale and more rapid adjustments to process components. The plant capacity will be 250,000 gallons of cellulosic ethanol annually. Site preparations are scheduled to begin this fall, and ethanol should be available from the pilot plant by December 2009.

“Our technology is ready to pilot and we are eager to get the steel in the ground,” said DuPont Danisco Technology Leader John Pierce. “The high cellulosic content of switchgrass makes it an optimal feedstock for ethanol production. Its yields today make it more than competitive with other biomass sources, and it has the potential to produce over 1,000 gallons of ethanol per acre in the future. The joint venture is now targeting the two optimal biomass feedstocks in the United States and we are ready to take our technology to the next level of commercial viability.”
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:50 AM
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LA County to weigh allowing ethanol plant


Quote:
LANCASTER, Calif.—Los Angeles officials this week will consider whether to approve the county's first ethanol plant.

Irvine-based BlueFire Ethanol says its plant proposed for Lancaster would be the first commercial facility in the nation to process biowaste into ethanol.
Ethanol is an alcohol added to gasoline to make it burn cleaner. . . .

The county Planning Commission will consider the proposal Wednesday, and construction on the $30 million plant could start as early as next month.

California will have five ethanol plants operating by the end of August.


South Sioux plant will use beef tallow to make biodiesel

Quote:
SOUTH SIOUX CITY -- In a week's time, Beef Products Inc.'s plant in South Sioux City churns out about 22 million pounds of beef tallow.

That's a whole lot of fat. Soon, most, if not all, of it will be used to power semi-trucks, pickups and other vehicles that run on diesel fuel.

BPI, the world's largest producer of lean boneless beef, has teamed with a biodiesel producer, Natural Innovative Renewable Energy. The two firms on Friday formally unveiled plans for a 60-million-gallon-per-year biodiesel plant, expected to create three dozen new jobs.

The company hopes to start construction this fall or early next year, said Jim Venner, a Breda, Iowa-based consultant for the biodiesel project. After the startup, production could begin as early as 18 months later, he said.

The $100 million project would become Nebraska's largest biodiesel plant, and the first in the state to make the clean-burning, renewable fuel from animal fat.

Gov. Dave Heineman, who headlined Friday's groundbreaking ceremony, said he expects Natural Innovative Renewable Energy to help elevate the Cornhusker state's biodiesel industry to the same level as its corn-based ethanol production, which now ranks No. 2 in the nation.
As you read these stories, think not just about the fuel, but about all of the related economic activity that the projects are creating, and how the money invested is staying in each area's local economy. Also note how in each area, fuel is being made from local resources.

Hawaii: 8 million gallons of biodiesel per year from algae

An algae-based oil factory is being proposed for Maui. Here, a marine algae venture, run by HR BioPetroleum Inc. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, is shown in Kailua-Kona.
Quote:
Alexander & Baldwin Inc., HR BioPetroleum Inc. and Hawaiian Electric Industries subsidiaries Hawaiian Electric Co. and Maui Electric Co. said yesterday they have signed a tentative agreement to build an algae plant on up to 1,000 acres of agricultural land owned by A&B next to HECO's Maalaea power plant starting in 2011.
...
The estimated yield of an algae farm is 6,000 to 10,000 gallons of biodiesel an acre a year, more than the 600 gallons an acre produced from palm or jatropha, or 48 gallons an acre from soy beans, Shonsey said.
Missouri: 15 million gallons of biodiesel per year from animal fat.
Quote:
St. Joseph’s third biodiesel plant broke ground Wednesday morning on south Stockyards Expressway.

It was only ceremonial; ground preparation work is already done at Terra Bioenergy. Concrete pads are poured for storage tanks and much of the equipment for the refinery is built, waiting to be installed.

The $25 million plant is scheduled to be complete in February. It will employ 25 to 30 people and produce 15 million gallons per year, said David Holcombe, chief executive officer of Terra.

Terra’s plant will primarily use animal fat to produce biodiesel, which can be used in virtually all diesel engines. The animal fat gives Terra an edge over most other operations, which use soybean or vegetable oil, Mr. Holcombe said.
Louisiana: 75 million gallons per year of synthetic fuel from animal fat.
Quote:
Once in operation, the Geismar plant is expected to produce about 75 million gallons of renewable synthetic fuel annually. The fuel produced by the venture will offer the same benefits of synthetic fuels derived from coal or natural gas while providing substantial performance and environmental advantages over petroleum-based fuels. These benefits include higher cetane levels, which are a measure of combustion quality, and superior thermal stability, making it effective for advanced military applications. In addition, replacing traditional petroleum fuel with this fuel substantially reduces total greenhouse gas emissions.

Unlike the ethanol and bio-diesel industries, which use food ingredients such as corn and soybeans to produce fuel, the Dynamic Fuels project will use various non-food grade animal fats produced or procured by Tyson Foods, such as beef tallow, pork lard, chicken fat and greases.

Iowa: 55 million gallons ethanol per year from corn
Quote:
The plant in Superior, owned by Green Plains Renewable Energy Inc, produced its first 20,000 gallons of ethanol early Tuesday.

Wayne B. Hoovestol, chief executive officer, told invited media the plant can produce 100 gallons of ethanol a minute at normal speeds.

The plan is to use corn purchased through the Great Plains network as well as from farmers. "It will all be purchased locally," he said.

The local area encompasses a 20-mile radius. It is anticipated the facility will spend $130 million per year to purchase the 18-20 million bushels of corn needed to produce ethanol and its revered byproduct, distillers grain.

Once the ethanol is produced, it will exit the plant on unit trains comprised of 80-90 cars.

Hoovestol said the rail-delivered ethanol will be transported to California, Florida, New York and other locales.
...
Hoovestol said it takes approximately 2 1/2 weeks to fill a train. "We will be producing over one million gallons a week."
Mozambique: 55 million gallons of ethanol per year from sugarcane.
Quote:
MAPUTO, July 16 (Xinhua) -- The Mozambican government on Tuesday approved a large biofuel project, under which 18,000 hectares in Dombe, in the central province of Manica, will be planted with sugarcane for the production of ethanol.

The project, budgeted at 280 million U.S. dollars, belongs to the company "Mozambique Principle Energy".

Although the government spokesperson, Deputy Education Minister Luis Covane, told reporters that this firm is owned by Mozambican and Mauritian interests, its parent company, Principle Capital, is registered in London, and also has offices in Geneva and Cape Town.

The goal of Principle Energy is to produce 213 million litres of ethanol a year, starting in 2013. This will require a production of 2.5 million tons of sugarcane a year (12,000 tons ofcane per hectare).

This project also includes the production of 82.2 megawatts of energy, starting in 2012. The company itself will use 20 percent of this, and supply the remainder to the national grid.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:51 AM
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California: 10.5 million gallons of ethanol per year form municipal waste.
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PLEASANTON, Calif., July 18, 2008 – Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc., today announced that it is advancing next-generation ethanol production with its plans to build one of the first commercial-scale production facilities for converting municipal solid waste to ethanol. The plant will process municipal solid waste–household garbage–revolutionizing waste disposal while creating a much needed low-cost, reliable and environmentally clean renewable transportation fuel.

When it begins operations in early 2010, the Sierra BioFuels plant is expected to produce approximately 10.5 million gallons of ethanol per year, and to process nearly 90,000 tons per year of municipal solid waste that would otherwise have been disposed of in landfills. Fulcrum BioEnergy will design, finance, construct, own and operate the plant, which will be located ten miles east of Reno at the Tahoe-Reno Industrial Center in Storey County, Nevada. This latestage development project is expected to cost approximately $120 million and is set to enter construction by the end of this year.
California: 9 new natural gas fueling stations
Quote:
SEAL BEACH, Calif., Jul 17, 2008 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- The Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) and the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) recently approved grant awards of $3.6 million to Clean Energy Fuels Corp. (Nasdaq:CLNE) to help defray the cost of expanding the Southern California network of natural gas fueling stations with nine new stations. In addition, SCAQMD announced grant awards totaling $7.7 million to assist a group of Clean Energy's customer companies with the purchase of clean-burning natural-gas powered heavy-duty fleet trucks, full-size buses and taxis.

USA: Registered voters approve increased use of ethanol by 2:1 margin -- blame gas, not ethanol, for high food prices
Quote:
A recent bi-partisan survey of 1,200 registered voters shows that by a 2:1 margin, the public supports increased use of ethanol in our nation’s fuel supply. This majority crosses party lines, capturing conservatives and environmentalists alike. Voters largely blame the rising cost of food on fuel prices; less than one in ten blame the expanded use of ethanol.

Florida: Ethanol from municipal waste
Quote:
MINNEAPOLIS, Jul 17, 2008 (BUSINESS WIRE) ----Diversified Ethanol... has negotiated additional ethanol plant design Purchase Orders. One of the first of these Purchase Orders is a $12 million construction project based in Dade City, Florida ....

This "new style" ethanol plant generates ethanol from food waste as well as other post consumer waste. The plant's compact size allows Diversified Ethanol to add an innovative water filtration system. The water filtration technology is an extremely important process in achieving an improved ethanol conversion, faster Local, State and Federal plant permitting, and increased profitability. The smaller waste-based plant designs achieve significantly improved cash flow when compared to large corn-based ethanol plants.

Washington, D.C.: Do you really think oil is not subsidized?
Quote:
Clifford D. May, president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy institute focusing on terrorism: “Do you really think oil is not subsidized? Former CIA director James Woolsey estimates that U.S. oil companies receive preferential tax treatment worth more than $250 billion a year — and that doesn’t include the military costs necessary to keep oil supplies flowing around the world. We do that because oil is a strategic commodity: Western economies cannot function without it. That will be true until the day oil is forced to compete with a variety of alternative fuels.”
Nebraska and Minnesota: Biofuel Energy Corp begins shipping from its two 115 million-gallon-per-year ethanol plants

Quote:
DENVER, July 17, 2008 /PRNewswire-FirstCall via COMTEX/ -- BIOFUEL ENERGY CORP. announced today that it had made initial shipments of ethanol and distillers grain from its plants in Wood River, Nebraska and Fairmont, Minnesota. Last week, roughly 2 million gallons of ethanol were shipped. The related sales revenue will be reflected in the Company's financial statements for the quarter ending September 30, 2008.

Nigeria: Ethanol from sweet sorgum will create 406,000 new jobs
Quote:
Global Biofuels Limited, the first biofuels refinery in Nigeria, endorsed by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), has committed the sum of N87.5billion to ethanol project in the country.

To foster rapid production, the company has also brought in two varieties of sweet sorghum to be produced for feedstock from PRAJ in India while more varieties of feedstock had been developed by the company.
...
["The venture’s CEO, Dr. Felix Babatunde Obada, said that the venture would create 406,000 jobs."]

China: 286 million gallons of ethanol per year from cassava
Quote:
Beijing, July 18 - Beverages manufacturer Hainan Yedao Co. Ltd, together with a state-owned oil company, plans to build a fuel ethanol plant with annual capacity of 100,000 tonnes using cassava as feedstock, Hainan Yedao said on Friday.
There are 286 gallons of ethanol in one metric ton. Cassava:



USA: Only 8% blame higher food prices on ethanol
Quote:
49 percent chose "increased cost of gasoline and fuel"
11 percent chose "increased commodities speculation"
8 percent chose "increased use of grain for ethanol"
8 percent chose "corporate takeover of food production"
7 percent chose "increased demand in China and India"
7 percent chose "severe weather"
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:52 AM
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First-in-Class Facility for Production of Renewable Diesel to be Co-located at Pulp and Paper Mill in Park Falls, WI

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PARK FALLS, Wis., July 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Flambeau River BioFuels is pleased to announce that it has received approval of its $30 million grant request from the U.S. Department of Energy to construct and operate a first- in-class biorefinery at an existing pulp and paper mill in Park Falls, Wisconsin. ...

When in full operation, the biorefinery will produce at least 6 million gallons of liquid fuels per year in the form of renewable sulfur-free diesel. The biorefinery will not be dependent on any food-based feedstock materials, but rather on by-products or residuals from forest and agricultural sources. The biorefinery will also generate at least 1 trillion BTUs per year of process heat that will be sold to Flambeau River Papers, which will make it the first integrated pulp and paper mill in North America to be fossil fuel free.

Shell and Iogen announce extended alliance to accelerate a next generation biofuel

Quote:
Royal Dutch Shell plc and its subsidiaries (“Shell”) and Iogen Corporation today announced an extended commercial alliance to accelerate development and deployment of cellulosic ethanol.

The terms of the agreement include a significant investment by Shell in technology development with Iogen Energy Corporation, a jointly owned development company dedicated to advancing cellulosic ethanol. The arrangement will also see Shell increasing its shareholding in Iogen Energy Corporation from 26.3% to 50%. Shell first took an equity stake in 2002.

...

Iogen’s first demonstration commercial plant opened in Ottawa in 2004. Shell is considering investing in a full-scale commercial cellulosic ethanol plant and is contributing to Iogen’s detailed feasibility and design assessment work.

Verenium and Marubeni Advance the Development of Cellulosic Ethanol Facilities in Asia

Quote:
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., and TOKYO, July 15 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Verenium Corporation (Nasdaq: VRNM), a pioneer in the development of next-generation cellulosic ethanol and high-performance specialty enzymes, and Marubeni Corporation today announced that, pursuant to the terms of their joint development agreement, they are continuing to advance the commercialization of cellulosic ethanol projects utilizing Verenium's proprietary technology in Asia with the opening of a three million-liter-per-year plant in Saraburi, Thailand. Marubeni and Tsukishima Kikai Co., Ltd. have already incorporated Verenium's technology into BioEthanol Japan's 1.4 million-liter-per-year cellulosic ethanol plant in Osaka, which utilizes construction wood waste as a feedstock.
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"We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language." --President Theodore Roosevelt, 1907
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  #14  
Old 08-07-2008, 10:55 AM
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HoosierRon HoosierRon is offline
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Scientists first made biodiesel from algae in the laboratory. Once that works, they move on to "demonstration" or "pilot" scale, which shows it works outside the lab, but not big enough to actually make money. Once that works, they move on to commercial scale, which is big enough to make a profit and sell it on an ongoing basis.

Progress seen in biodiesel fuel production locally

Quote:
CARLSBAD — A major milestone has been reached in local efforts to produce a high quality biodiesel fuel from algae oil.

The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management recently harvested commercial-scale quantities of algae from its test salt water ponds located at New Mexico State University Agriculture Science Center in north Eddy County . . . . the produced oil appears to have all the right profiles for making high quality biodiesel fuel.
...
"This marks an historical milestone in developing the technology necessary to make endlessly renewable fuel that does not compete with food crops for resources."
Prather-Stroud said the center is projecting construction and operation of a commercial-scale integrated system for producing algae oil within the next 18 to 24 months.

I spent this last weekend in the U.P. This is a huge development for the economy of the area.

Historic investment set for production facility in U.P.’s Chippewa County

Quote:
Mascoma Corporation CEO Bruce A. Jamerson today announced that the Massachusetts-based company has entered into a series of key strategic relationships to further Mascoma’s efforts to build its first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Agreements with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), JM Longyear, and alliances formed with Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) will help bring the plant to Chippewa County, south of Sault Ste. Marie, where clean-burning, fuel-grade ethanol will be produced from wood fiber. The agreements build on Mascoma’s decision announced last July to locate in Michigan.
...
Mascoma chose Michigan for its first commercial-scale facility based on the vast sustainable forests and agricultural materials available and the expertise provided by JM Longyear. In addition, Mascoma will collaborate with MSU and MTU to develop and hone scientific processes that utilize Michigan feedstocks for cellulosic ethanol production.
...
“This new facility will mean more jobs in our agriculture, timber, and manufacturing industries while benefiting our environment and energy security as a nation,” he said.

Mascoma and Marquette-based JM Longyear, a leading natural resource company, entered into a strategic relationship to combine Mascoma’s technology with JM Longyear’s significant project development experience, including its recent $1.6 billion Minnesota Steel project and its deep natural resource experience.
...
Prior to the announcement of its first commercial-scale production facility in northern Michigan, Mascoma announced a pilot project in Rome, New York, which is now under construction and will be completed by the end of the year, and a 2MMGY pre-commercial scale facility to be run on switchgrass in Tennessee. Last month, Mascoma announced equity investments by General Motors and Marathon Oil Corporation (NYSE: MRO) as part of a $61 million third round of funding.
(

According to http://www.e85prices.com/, the following states have E85 for sale at 30%+ less than gasoline:

Colorado
Illinois
Indiana

Iowa
Massachusetts
Minnesota
Mississippi
New York
South Dakota

In addition, the following states offer it at 25%+ less than gasoline:

Kansas
Ohio
Oregon
Nebraska
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin

Nationwide, the average difference is 17.9%.

And I might add, E85 is brought to you courtesy of the red, white and blue.


$100,000 gift led the attack on ethanol

Quote:
AUSTIN — Gov. Rick Perry's request for a waiver of federal corn-based ethanol production mandates was prompted by a March meeting he had with East Texas poultry producer Lonnie "Bo" Pilgrim, who six days later gave $100,000 to the Republican Governors Association chaired by Perry.

In the three weeks following that donation, Perry's staff began preparing to submit the renewable fuel standards waiver request to the federal Environmental Protection Agency, according to 596 pages of records obtained from the governor's office by the Houston Chronicle under the Texas Public Information Act.
...
Perry pressed for the waiver despite an April 10 Texas A&M study that showed a waiver of federal mandates on ethanol production would have little or no effect in driving down the price of feed corn for poultry and livestock. The A&M study blamed rising corn prices on the cost of oil, global demands for corn and commodities speculation.

At Perry's request, A&M did a second study that was released in June. It found that if corn crops were short because of Midwestern flooding, a waiver would significantly lower corn prices.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture earlier this week reported that the corn harvest would be smaller than last year but only because fewer acres were planted.
..
Perry's staff coordinated preparation of the waiver request with Pilgrim's Pride lobbyist Gaylor Hughey of Tyler and Cliff Angelo with Public Strategies, the firm handling a public relations campaign against ethanol for Pilgrim's Pride and a coalition of meat producers.

Talking points prepared for Pilgrim's appearance before the Republican governors were almost identical to ones Public Strategies gave reporters in advance of a June 24 news conference the firm organized for Perry at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
Whenever foreign nations and American lobbyists carrying $100,000 gifts are on the same side of an issue, I tend to find myself on the other side.


Solazyme Unveils Algal Renewable Diesel That Meets ASTM D-975 Specifications

Quote:
Solazyme has unveiled a microalgae-derived renewable diesel fuel, SoladieselRD, that meets American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-975 specifications for petroleum diesel fuels. SoladieselRD is the first algal renewable diesel to meet these standards, and the second algae-derived fuel from the company.

SoladieselRD is output from a refinery, where a hydrotreatment stage deoxygenates the algal oil, resulting in a pure hydrocarbon product. The final product’s chemical composition is identical to that of standard petroleum-based diesel, and SoladieselRD is fully compatible with the existing transportation fuel infrastructure.
...
In January, Solazyme announced that it had entered into a biodiesel feedstock development and testing agreement with Chevron Technology Ventures, a division of Chevron USA to work on developing algae optimized to produce oils for use in hydrotreatment at a refinery.
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"We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language." --President Theodore Roosevelt, 1907
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  #15  
Old 08-07-2008, 10:57 AM
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HoosierRon HoosierRon is offline
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For all of you people that gripe about the "cost" of ethanol, please note what a $100,000,000 investment in Nebraska's economy will do for job creation and tax revenue.

Novozymes to Build New $80-100M Ethanol Enzymes Production Facility in US

Quote:
The new facility will be located on a 30-acre property at the Biorefinery Campus in Blair, Nebraska, approximately 25 miles north of Omaha. Novozymes expects to break ground in late 2008 with operations beginning in late 2010.

Initially the focus of the new plant will be to supply enzymes for corn based ethanol and enzymes for cellulosic ethanol start ups. The plant in Blair will be designed for later expansions to ensure Novozymes can meet demands for enzymes for cellulosic ethanol. We are undertaking an unprecedented effort to make these enzymes available by 2010.

Meat vs Fuel: grain trends in China 1995-2008



Quote:
A change in Chinese meat consumption habits since 1995 is diverting eight billion bushels of grain per year to livestock feed and could empty global grain stocks by September 2010, according to a new study from Biofuels Digest, now available for download here in an expanded version.

The Study, "Meat vs Fuel: Grain use in the U.S. and China, 1995-2008" concluded that, even if the U.S. ethanol industry were shut down tomorrow, rising Chinese demand for meat, and the ensuing livestock feed demand, will empty global grain stocks as soon as 2013. The report offers gloomy news for policymakers who have hoped to address global food vs. fuel concerns by restraining U.S. ethanol demand.

The study found that the US produced 349 million tones of corn last year, up from 192 million tones in 1995, but the 157 million tonne increase has not kept pace with rising demand. The US ethanol industry, which has been criticized as the primary cause of grain shortages and rising prices, increased its grain usage by 31 million tonnes during the 12 year period. By contrast, livestock grain demand to supply Chinese meat consumption increased by 199 million tonnes.

"Given that the US population has grown 15 percent in the past 13 years, the 82 percent increase in US corn production left plenty for people, plenty for livestock, and plenty for ethanol."ť said Lane. "The bad news is that the grain was Shanghaied, leaving us with a fuel crisis and a food crisis. The good news is that it's easier to find a steak in Beijing."

The study resolves several questions that had been unanswered in the fuel vs. fuel debate by focusing on rising demand from China as well as the U.S. The report identified that rice, rather than corn or wheat, suffered the largest price increases over the 12-year period, despite the fact that rice is not used for biofuel production. The study also ties falling global grain stocks to corresponding increases in Chinese consumption.

IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON RETAIL GASOLINE PRICES IN MISSOURI


Quote:
On January 1, 2008 Missouri became the third state to require all gasoline sold in the state to be blended with 10 percent ethanol (E10).
...
The use of a 10 percent ethanol blend saved Missouri drivers 7.7 cents per gallon at the retail pump in 2007 for a total savings of $158.2 million, or $40 for each of Missouri’s 3.9 million licensed drivers. Reflecting current gasoline and ethanol price movements the savings are expected to average 9.8 cents per gallon or $72.80 per driver this year as 10 percent ethanol is used statewide in 2008.
...
As can be seen in Table 1 EIA reported that the average wholesale, or “rack”, price for gasoline in Missouri was $2.195 per gallon in 2007. ... Ethanol is blended with gasoline at the terminal for delivery to retail stations. As reported by USDA, the average price of ethanol, FOB plant in Iowa (the closest reporting point to Missouri) was $1.938 per gallon. The blender who purchases ethanol for use with gasoline qualifies for the $0.51 per gallon Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit (VEETC) which reduced his actual cost of ethanol to $1.428 per gallon.

Ethanol is “Ugly Baby”



Quote:
Ethanol is “an ugly baby but it’s ours and it will move cars,” according to billionaire oilman T. Boone Pickens.

Speaking at the Oil and Gas Investor’s Energy Capital Forum in Houston Tuesday, Boone emphasized that he prefers the less-than-perfect fuel over imported oil because there is “no question” that America must embrace alternate energy sources to alleviate the $700-billion transfer of wealth out of the country to oil imports.

Pickens says the United States is having an energy crisis and that should be the top campaign issue in the presidential election. “Energy is not a debate; it’s a crisis for this country,” Pickens said. “We cannot continue down the path were on. It’s that desperate.”
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"We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language." --President Theodore Roosevelt, 1907
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