Checking and adding CVT fluid [Archive] - Jeep Patriot Forums

: Checking and adding CVT fluid


chazz
11-14-2009, 10:07 AM
I've been checking out my new Patriot (FDII) and there's one thing I can't figure out -

It appears there is a place under the hood to add CVT fluid. But there is no dipstick and the manual says the level must be checked by a trained technician.

So is there any way for me to check the fluid level?

JoeBecker
11-14-2009, 10:44 AM
Leave that up to the professionals. From other discussions about this, the process is not just a matter of pulling a dipstick and seeing if it is in the range.

Armando Pineda
11-14-2009, 10:46 AM
the short answer is no...take it to the dealer...read other posts in this forum regarding the proper procedure...hell even the dipstick is almost $100 u.s.d.

tiptronic
11-14-2009, 10:55 AM
CVT is not a DIY servicable item--leave it alone , you may do more harm than good!!

todde702
11-14-2009, 10:57 AM
It's true, you need a special dipstick that also reads the fluid temperature, then there's a conversion chart they used based on the level and temp to know if it's correct or not.

However, you can use your engine oil dipstick to at least have an idea. Here's what I did. After driving home from the dealer, my mom's and brother's to show off my new Jeep, I got home and started poking around and also noticed no trans dipstick. Now everything was still very hot under the hood so I pulled my engine oil dipstick, cleaned it off very thoroughly, then put it down into the transmission dipstick tube (fully seated). When I pulled it out, I had fluid up to the lowest mark of the engine dipstick. Now this doesn't tell me whether the fluid level is correct or not, but it does let me know if the level goes down, to have the dealer look at it. I assume the level was correct since I had just picked it up from them that day. So every now and then, after a long drive, I just check the level and make sure something's there. It's better then nothing.

Armando Pineda
11-14-2009, 11:09 AM
It's true, you need a special dipstick that also reads the fluid temperature, then there's a conversion chart they used based on the level and temp to know if it's correct or not.

However, you can use your engine oil dipstick to at least have an idea. Here's what I did. After driving home from the dealer, my mom's and brother's to show off my new Jeep, I got home and started poking around and also noticed no trans dipstick. Now everything was still very hot under the hood so I pulled my engine oil dipstick, cleaned it off very thoroughly, then put it down into the transmission dipstick tube (fully seated). When I pulled it out, I had fluid up to the lowest mark of the engine dipstick. Now this doesn't tell me whether the fluid level is correct or not, but it does let me know if the level goes down, to have the dealer look at it. I assume the level was correct since I had just picked it up from them that day. So every now and then, after a long drive, I just check the level and make sure something's there. It's better then nothing.
I did the same thing...this is very good advice...if you are "stuck" somewhere or tranny is "acting strange" and want to rule this out as a problem, etc. or even for piece of mind.

ti-claude31
11-14-2009, 11:14 AM
i had a talk with my dealer mecanic about the transmission fluid.he told me ,if there is no leak and if you dont have any problem dont touch it,and if you do have problem with it, will either fix it or change it (end of discussion).

tiptronic
11-14-2009, 11:46 AM
Using the engine dipstick is OK at . but because the special fluid has to work at pressures up to 900 lbs sq in--you will get different readings at different temps . Unless you have the correct Dip/Temp/ sensor , dont be tempted to add fluid just because it LOOKS LOW !!

heckler
11-14-2009, 04:18 PM
The only think special is you need to know the CVT fluid temperature, which affects the level. This is why it's not servicable by most people.


CHECK CVT OIL LEVEL

1. Verify that the vehicle is parked on a level surface.
2. Remove the dipstick tube cap.
WARNING: There is a risk of accident from vehicle starting off by itself when engine is running. There is a risk of injury from contusions and burns if you insert your hands into the engine when it is started or when it is running. Secure vehicle to prevent it from moving off by itself. Wear properly fastened and close-fitting work clothes. Do not touch hot or rotating parts.
3. Actuate the service brake. Start engine and let it run at idle speed in selector lever position "P".
4. Shift through the transmission modes several times with the vehicle stationary and the engine idling.
5. Warm up the transmission, wait at least 2 minutes and check the oil level with the engine running. Push the Oil Dipstick 9336 into transmission fill tube until the dipstick tip contacts the oil pan and pull out again, read off oil level, repeat if necessary.
NOTE: The dipstick will protrude from the fill tube when installed.


CVT TRANSMISSION FILL GRAPH

(this graph is in the service manual, and tells you what the correct height is, depending on the fluid temperature measured with the scangauge)


6. Check transmission oil temperature using the appropriate scan tool.
7. The transmission Oil Dipstick 9336 has indicator marks every 10 mm. Determine the height of the oil level on the dipstick and using the height, the transmission temperature, and the Transmission Fluid Graph, determine if the transmission oil level is correct.
8. Add or remove oil as necessary and recheck the oil level.
9. Once the oil level is correct, install the dipstick tube cap.

todde702
11-15-2009, 09:38 AM
Using the engine dipstick is OK at . but because the special fluid has to work at pressures up to 900 lbs sq in--you will get different readings at different temps . Unless you have the correct Dip/Temp/ sensor , dont be tempted to add fluid just because it LOOKS LOW !!

Agreed! I was not saying to use the engine oil dipstick to determine whether you could add fluid or not. Just as an indicator on whether you should stop by the dealer or not. And you want to try and always check it in the same location and conditions (in other words, always check it in your driveway, right after driving home from work since it will generally always be the same temperature and the vehicle will be sitting in the same orientation). Of course really hot or cold days can change the temperature slightly.

jepstr67
11-15-2009, 10:23 AM
That's what I love about Jeeps. They are always so simple and easy to work on. :doh:

fishtruk
11-18-2009, 01:02 PM
:wow:Mine (CVT) is waiting a few seconds to go into drive after I back out of the driveway when it's cold. Doesn't do it any other time. 2008 vehicle.

(I live on a busy street:wow:)

Has anyone had this and did correcting the fluid level fix it?

Thanks!
nelZ

zbee
11-21-2009, 05:51 AM
I think I am going to go with Redline Synthetic Transmission fluid MT-90 Does anyone know how many quarts I would need to do a complete changeover? Is it six quarts?

apart from voiding the lifetime warranty, i would not recomend changing whatsoever the fluid, the formula is specifcaly formulated and proprietry for the cvt

tiptronic
11-21-2009, 06:59 AM
As stated by zbee----- Your Fluid NEVER NEEDS CHANGING EXCEPT UNDER EXTEME USAGE!!!!!!! CVT Fluid is nothing like Normal Auto fluid , it contains RUBBER granules to aid friction. Plus you need the CORRECT DIP/TEMP/SENSOR & the chart that goes with it!!!! Dont mess with things you know nothing about & dont understand!!!!!

Armando Pineda
11-21-2009, 12:12 PM
I think I am going to go with Redline Synthetic Transmission fluid MT-90 Does anyone know how many quarts I would need to do a complete changeover? Is it six quarts?
Stop! this is the wrong fluid for CVT.

Afmcronnie
11-21-2009, 10:41 PM
I dont know about the '07 and '08 models, but on my 2009 the dipstick tube is SEALED! The seal warns you that it is to be opened only by the dealer, and the service manager at my dealership told me that breaking that seal will AUTOMATICALLY void the lifetime warranty on the CVT. Might be something to think about if you have your oil changed by somone other than the dealer, a well-meaning mechanic voids your warranty by checking the trans fluid...

tiptronic
11-22-2009, 05:47 AM
They probably got fed -up with too many Dick Heads messing about with stuff they dont understand---Yea sealed for life --Good Idea!!

hunter44102
11-22-2009, 10:38 AM
On my Honda Civic (hybrid), I had the dealer change the CVT fluid at 59k miles the first time.

It started acting like an Automatic. I would feel a 'shifting' when i know it shouldn't.

After the change, it went back to normal

07patriot_LA
03-03-2013, 02:04 PM
After reading these posts, I thought I'd register and relate a story in case it helps anyone else out.

As I was driving down an LA freeway on a Saturday morning a few weeks ago, a dump truck in front of me dropped a bunch of debris. I initially thought these flat spinning black things were large rubber o-rings, but after a few of them hit and skipped off the car, I realized they were something heavier. As I passed the truck, a sign on its door read "O&M Metals - Sun Valley, CA". Since there was apparently no damage, I continued on my way. About 15 minutes later, I noticed an accumulation of what appeared to be an oily spray building on my windshield. As I got near my destination, I noticed a big stream of purple fluid working its way up my hood toward the windshield.

When I stopped the car to inspect it, I discovered that a flat metal disc had found its way past the plastic grill edges and had ruptured the oil cooler in front of the radiator.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-HcnA6gJ3ZII/UTOYlQqf2xI/AAAAAAAAApE/yeGaJssTdMc/s697/IMAG0207.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-1Oyi2dKaMLE/UTOYvqRE5fI/AAAAAAAAApU/HRZNR7qqLL0/s697/IMAG0209.jpg

After having the car towed home, I surveyed the damage, saw that I needed a new CVT fluid cooler/AC condenser unit, contacted the Jeep dealer in Alhambra, CA and they quoted me a price of $219 on the phone (which mysteriously turned into $289 when I went to pick it up). I also picked up a quart of CVT fluid, which the dealer sold for $17. I asked the guy "this is the purple stuff, right?" and he told me that it was actually green. I'm guessing that somewhere along the line, the monkeys at JiffyLube added something else to the mix.
I don't work on this car myself, so I don't have a service manual or shop manual for it. I bought this car new, and I've taken it to the dealer for regular major service, and to JiffyLube for oil changes. The only work I've done on the Patriot is changing out the brake pads. (Mechanically, I prefer to work on my older cars - '61 CJ5, '77 Scout, and '65 mustang.)

After reading these posts regarding the CVT fluid, I figured I could tackle this job myself for under $500. I discharged the A/C, removed the front grill/bumper cover unit, then removed the A/C lines, the CVT fluid lines and swapped out the part. I put everything back together, charged up the A/C and added the 1 quart of Mopar CVT fluid. I tested the tranny for a minute on my sloped driveway, and decided that it still needed more fluid. Not wanting to pay $17 per quart, I found that my local O'Reilly could order Valvoline CVT fluid (which meets the Mopar specs) for just over $10 per quart. So I ordered 2 quarts and picked them up the next day.
I then added fluid - about 8 oz. at a time, each time shifting through all the gears, going a few feet up and down my sloped driveway, until I got it to the point where it would not roll backwards facing uphill idling in "Drive", and was not making any whining noises.
Since the repair I've driven the car about 1000 miles (a couple of long freeway trips and a lot of city driving), and everything seems to be OK for now. I'll keep my fingers crossed, and I'll post an update if anything goes wrong.